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What is Earned Media? 7 Ways to Get It

But why is earned media important? And how can you get more of it? In this post, we’ll explore: Earned vs. paid vs. owned media Why earned media is important Examples of earned media How to get earned media If

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The post What is Earned Media? 7 Ways to Get It appeared first on SEO Blog by Ahrefs.

But why is earned media important? And how can you get more of it? In this post, we’ll explore: Earned vs. paid vs. owned media Why earned media is important Examples of earned media How to get earned media If…
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The post What is Earned Media? 7 Ways to Get It appeared first on SEO Blog by Ahrefs.Read MoreMarketingSEO Blog by Ahrefs

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5 Reasons Why PR Should Support Your Content Marketing Strategy

5 Reasons Why PR Should Support Your Content Marketing Strategy

To keep getting your content in front of the right people, you might want to include PR in your content marketing strategy. Here are the top 5 reasons why PR and content marketing should go hand in hand, along with examples of successful PR & content marketing activities.

To keep getting your content in front of the right people, you might want to include PR in your content marketing strategy. Here are the top 5 reasons why PR and content marketing should go hand in hand, along with examples of successful PR & content marketing activities.Read MoreContent MarketingSEMrush blog

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How to Create an Effective SEO Strategy (with Template)

How to Create an Effective SEO Strategy (with Template)

Having a solid SEO strategy is essential if you want to increase your organic traffic, and in this guide, we walk you through a proven 11 step process that you can follow for your own site, from benchmarking your current performance and setting goals through to finding keyword and content opportunities, building links and reporting on success.

Having a solid SEO strategy is essential if you want to increase your organic traffic, and in this guide, we walk you through a proven 11 step process that you can follow for your own site, from benchmarking your current performance and setting goals through to finding keyword and content opportunities, building links and reporting on success.Read MoreHow To, Tips, SEOSEMrush blog

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How to optimize a blog post for search engines: a checklist!

So you’ve decided to write a blog post. That’s great! Now let’s make sure your efforts pay off and it turns into an awesome post that also ranks. What will you need to write and optimize that blog post? What steps do you need to take? You can use this blog post checklist to make sure you’ve got all the bases covered. And with the improved publishing flow in our Yoast SEO plugin, this becomes even easier. Let’s have a look!

1. Conduct proper keyword research

You (probably) want to write a blog post about a topic related to you or your business. And that’s definitely something you should do. But, to make sure you reach your audience, you also want your blog post to rank in the search engines. This is where keyword research comes in.

Keyword research helps you determine which words your audience uses when they’re looking for a product, service, or information you offer. Because the words you use might not be the same as the ones your audience uses. By conducting keyword research you can draw up a list of keywords or keyphrases that are relevant to you, but also help you create content that ranks.

This is why keyword research is the first step in your blog post checklist, one you shouldn’t skip. Read more about it in our ultimate guide to keyword research.

2. Preparation is key

Now that you know what keyword or phrase you want to write about, you might want to get started right away. But there’s one more step in this checklist before you put your (digital) pen to paper. And that’s preparation. This might feel like an extra step, but it’s important to realize that the right preparation helps your readability and SEO, plus it saves you time in a later stage of your writing!

So take some time to think about what you want to say and to whom you want to say it. What is your goal with this text? Do you want to inform people about a certain topic or persuade them to buy one of your products? By formulating the purpose of your blog post and defining your audience for this post, it’ll become much easier to decide on your angle and writing style. Having a look at the search results can help you create great content that fits the needs of your audience.

It also pays off to think about the structure of your piece before you start writing. The structure is the skeleton of your text: it will help the reader and search engines grasp the main idea of your text. Also, it’s easier to start writing when you’ve already decided on your structure beforehand.

Start by writing down a list of topics you want to discuss in your post. After that, you can bundle similar topics together and your structure will begin to take shape. Now you can decide on the order of your topics and it’s up to you if this will be done chronologically, didactically, or any other way that suits your blog post.

Read more: Blog post structure: How to set up an easy-to-read text »

3. Start writing

When you’ve completed the first two steps of your blog post checklist, it’s time to start writing. And I know that this part can be hard, especially writing those first few sentences. My advice is to just start while keeping the structure you’ve created in mind. Don’t mind awkward sentences or typos too much in this phase, as this can take you out of the writing flow. You can fix them later on.

Also, don’t get hung up on your first paragraph or introduction too much. It’s always easier to write a beginning (and ending for that matter) once you’ve written the main body of your text. Just write down a few words or phrases you want to discuss in your first paragraph and start with your second paragraph if this comes easier.

In our ultimate guide to SEO Copywriting you can find more tips on how to start writing and boost your writing style.

4. Check your readability bullets

Once you have written your first draft, it’s time to correct all of those typos and awkward sentences. You should take the time to carefully read and re-read your blog post and make adjustments where needed to optimize it further.

An optimized blog post is a readable blog post. An easy way to check this is the readability score provided by Yoast SEO. Our content analysis will give you feedback on how easy to read your content is. For example, it allows you to detect whether you use too many long sentences or whether you use too much passive voice in your text. Let’s get rid of those and optimize the readability of your blog post.

With the release of Yoast SEO 14.4, we’ve added the possibility to check on how your content scores straight from the Document sidebar in the block editor. This makes it easy to keep an eye on the readability of your text while you’re editing it.

step 4 in this blog post checklist is to check your readability bullets in the yoast seo sidebar to optimize the readability of your blog post
Check the readability and SEO of your text directly from the Yoast SEO sidebar.

And if you’re wondering why your readability or SEO bullet is red or orange, just click on the arrow next to these bullets to get feedback on what you can still improve. This allows you to make changes right away, without taking you out of your writing flow.

5. Check your SEO bullets

When you’ve written a well-structured and readable blog post, you want it to rank in the search engines. So you want to optimize your blog post for your focus keyword or keyphrase! This is where the Yoast SEO analysis comes in. Assuming you haven’t skipped the first step in this checklist, your blog post will be focused on a keyword that is beneficial to your SEO strategy. Fill in your keyword in the focus keyphrase field and our SEO analysis will give you feedback on how SEO-friendly your article is.

As with the readability analysis, you are now able to check your SEO score in the Yoast sidebar in the block editor. This makes it possible to work on the SEO of your content while editing. And if your bullet is red or orange, simply click the arrow next to this bullet to get feedback on what you can improve.

Keep reading: Our must-read articles about Content SEO »

6. Preview your post for Google and social media

As you may have already noticed in the screenshot above, the sidebar offers you a preview of what your post will look like in Google, Facebook and Twitter. When you click one of these tabs in the sidebar, you can also edit these previews. To show you what this looks like, this is the screen you get when you click the ‘Google preview’ in the Yoast SEO sidebar:

step 6 in this blog post checklist is to preview your post on google and social media with the google preview in the yoast seo sidebar

This screen shows you what your post will look like in the search results, and gives you the possibility to edit your preview. However, it is important to note, that this preview is a suggestion we’re giving Google. In some cases, Google chooses a meta description or title for you.

Similar to your Google preview, the sidebar also allows you what your page will look like when you share it on Facebook or Twitter. Simply click the Facebook preview tab (or Twitter preview tab) and check what your post will look like. This also gives you the opportunity to change the post image, title and description. Take some time to do this, as the right post will increase the number of people clicking on your post!

Read on: Social media optimization with Yoast SEO »

7. Hit publish!

You’ve made it to the final step in this blog post checklist! And that’s to finally hit that publish button. If you’re feeling a bit hesitant about making your post public, don’t worry. Our plugin gives you the reassurance you need to send your new content into the world. After clicking the Publish button, we’ll give you a final overview of your scores on readability and SEO. This gives you the possibility to make some final adjustments if needed and happily press that button.

step 7 in this blog post checklist is to hit publish where you will get a final check before publishing
After clicking the Publish button, the Document sidebar will give you this overview.

After publishing your post, you’ll be greeted with a screen that gives you the link to your freshly published blog post. And to make this a part of your publishing workflow, we’ve added the possibility to share your post on social media right away.

social sharing in yoast seo 14.4
Share your post on Twitter and Facebook with our sharing buttons after publishing.

Why? Social media are a necessity for the growth and marketing of your website. By sharing your new blog post right away, you’re drawing attention to it and increasing the traffic to your site. This gives your new blog post a kickstart in getting exposure and will help your rankings.

Or automate your social publishing with Zapier

Would you like to automate your social sharing, so that a custom tweet or Facebook post is sent right after publishing your blog post? This is possible with our Zapier integration in Yoast SEO Premium. It’s very easy to use, as you only have to set it up once for this integration to automatically send every new post you publish to whichever platform you choose (out of Zapier’s 2000+ destinations).

This can save you some time without having to compromise on the quality of your social posts, as you can customize how and what you want to publish. Read more about this integration in our article on how to use Yoast SEO with Zapier or watch the video that explains this integration in our Yoast SEO 15.3 release post.

The blog post checklist in short

In this article, I’ve talked you through the blog post checklist to optimize your post for the search engines. First of all, every blog post should start by executing keyword research. Secondly, make sure you take the time to prepare your blog post carefully. And after you have written the post, use Yoast SEO to check the readability and SEO of your content.

This brings you to the final step in this checklist: publishing your awesome blog post and sharing it with your audience right away. Which brings me to my final step in this article: wishing you lots of luck with your writing!

Keep on reading: SEO copywriting checklist »

The post How to optimize a blog post for search engines: a checklist! appeared first on Yoast.

So you’ve decided to write a blog post. That’s great! Now let’s make sure your efforts pay off and it turns into an awesome post that also ranks. What will you need to write and optimize that blog post? What steps do you need to take? You can use this blog post checklist to make
The post How to optimize a blog post for search engines: a checklist! appeared first on Yoast.Read MoreContent SEO, SEO Copywriting, WordPress

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Image SEO: Optimizing images for search engines

Whether you’re a blogger or write articles for an online magazine or newspaper, chances are you’ll find yourself asking whether your article needs an image or not. The answer is always “Yes”. Images bring an article to life and also contribute to your website’s SEO. This post explains how to fully optimize an image for SEO and provides some pointers on using images for the best user experience.

Always use images

Images, when used correctly, will help readers better understand your article. The old saying “A picture is worth a thousand words” probably doesn’t apply to Google, but it’s certainly true when you need to spice up 1,000 dull words, illustrate what you mean in a chart or data flow diagram, or just make your social media posts more enticing.

It’s a simple recommendation: add images to every article you write to make them more appealing. What’s more, since visual search is getting increasingly important — as seen in Google’s vision for the future of search — it could turn out to provide you with a nice bit of traffic. And if you have visual content it makes sense to put image SEO a bit higher on your to-do list.

A while ago, Google Images got a brand-new interface with new filters, metadata, and even attribution. These cool new filters show that Google increasingly knows what’s in an image and how that image fits into the larger context.

A Google Image Search shows much more than just images

Finding the right image

Image SEO: This image isn't saying 'welcome to our company', it's saying 'welcome to a company'.

It’s always better to use original images – photos you have taken yourself – than stock photos. Your team page needs pictures of your actual team, not this dude on the right or one of his stock photo friends. Off topic: also, this dude really needs a haircut.

Your article needs an image relevant to its subject. If you’re adding a random photo just to get a green bullet in the Yoast SEO plugin’s content analysis, then you’re doing it wrong. The image should reflect the topic of the post or have illustrative purposes within the article. Also, try to place the image near the relevant text. If you have a main image or an image that you’re trying to rank, try to keep that near the top of the page, if that’s possible without feeling forced.

There is a simple image SEO reason for all of this: an image with related text ranks better for the keyword it is optimized for. But we’ll discuss image SEO later on in this article.

Alternatives

If you don’t have any original images that you can use, there are other ways to find unique images and still avoid stock photos. Flickr.com is a nice image source for instance, as you can use Creative Commons images. Just remember to attribute the original photographer. We also like the images provided by sites like Unsplash. We have a blog post that gives you an awesome overview of where to get great images. Steer clear of the obvious stock photos, and if you are using stock photos, pick the ones that look (ok, just a bit) more genuine. But whatever you use, you’ll probably find that images with people in them always look like stock photos. Unless you took the photos yourself, which (in our opinion) is always the best idea.

Obvious alternatives for photos could be graphs or illustrations, which is what we at Yoast use. If you’re interested, our resident illustrator Erwin wrote a fun article about the making of illustrations on our developers blog. Also, an honorable mention should go to animated GIFs, as they are incredibly popular these days.

Image SEO: Animated GIFs are popular these days
Animated GIFs are cool, but heavy loading

But even though animated GIFs are popular, don’t go overboard. It’ll make your post harder to read, as the movement of the image distracts your readers’ attention. They can also slow down your page.

Preparing images for use in your article

Once you have found the right image – whether it’s a photo, illustration, or chart – the next step is to optimize it for use on your website. So before you add your image, there are a number of things you need to think about:

Choose the right file name

Image SEO starts with the file name. You want Google to know what the image is about without even looking at it, so use your focus keyphrase in the image file name. It’s simple: if you’re writing an article on the Notre Dame and you use an image showing a sunrise in Paris over Notre Dame Cathedral, the file name shouldn’t be DSC4536.jpg. A proper file name would be notre-dame-paris-sunrise.jpg, making sure the main subject of the photo (and your article) is at the beginning of the file name.

Choose the right format

For images, the right format doesn’t exist; it depends on the kind of image and how you want to use it. In short, we recommend to:

  • choose JPEG for larger photos or illustrations: it will give you good results in terms of colors and clarity with a relatively small file size;
  • use PNG if you want to preserve background transparency in your image;
  • or, use WebP instead of JPEG and PNG. It will produce high-quality results with smaller file sizes. You can use tools like Squoosh to convert your image into WebP.
  • use SVG for logos and icons. With the help of CSS or JavaScript, you can manage images in SVG format, for instance, resize them without loss of quality.

If you know a large part of your audience uses specific browsers or devices, make sure to check whether your preferred format is supported by those browsers on CanIuse.com.

When you’ve chosen the right name and format, it’s time to resize and optimize your image!

Scale for image SEO

Loading times are important for UX and SEO. The faster the site, the easier it is for users and search engines to visit (and index) a page. Images can have a big impact on loading times, especially when you upload a huge image to display it really small – for example, a 2500×1500 pixels image displayed at 250×150 pixels size – as the entire image still has to be loaded. So resize the image to how you want it displayed. WordPress helps you do this by automatically providing the image in multiple sizes after uploading it. Unfortunately, that doesn’t mean the file size is optimized as well, that’s just the image display size. So think about the size in which you upload your images!

Use responsive images

This one is essential for SEO as well, and if you’re using WordPress it’s done for you since it was added by default from version 4.4. Images should have the srcset attribute, which makes it possible to serve a different image per screen width — this is especially useful for mobile devices.

Reduce file size

The next step in image SEO should be to make sure that your scaled image is compressed so it’s served in the smallest file size possible.

Of course, you could just export the image and experiment with quality percentages, but we prefer to use the highest possible quality images, especially given the popularity of retina and similar screens these days.

jpegmini image seo
Tools like JPEGmini can drastically reduce image file sizes without artifacts

You can still reduce the file size of these images by removing the EXIF data, for example. We recommend using tools like ImageOptim or websites like SquooshJPEGmini, jpeg.io or Kraken.io.

When you’ve optimized your images, you can test your page with tools like Google PageSpeed Insights, Lighthouse, WebPageTest.org or Pingdom.

Adding the image to your article

While Google is getting better at recognizing what’s in an image, you shouldn’t totally rely on their abilities yet. It all comes down to you providing the context for that image — so fill in as much as you can! We’ll discuss how below.

Your image is ready to use, but don’t just throw it into your article anywhere. As mentioned earlier, adding it close to related textual content helps a lot. It makes sure the text is as relevant to the image as the image is to the text, something users and Google prefer.

Captions

The image caption is the text that accompanies the image on the page — if you look at the images in this article, it’s the text in the gray box below each one. Why are captions important for image SEO? Because people use them when scanning an article. People tend to scan headings, images and captions as they scan a web page. Way back in 1997, Jakob Nielsen wrote:

“Elements that enhance scanning include headings, large type, bold text, highlighted text, bulleted lists, graphics, captions, topic sentences, and tables of contents.”

In 2012, KissMetrics went even further, stating that:

“Captions under images are read on average 300% more than the body copy itself, so not using them, or not using them correctly, means missing out on an opportunity to engage a huge number of potential readers.”

Do you need to add captions to every image? No, because sometimes images serve other purposes. Decide whether you want to use yours for SEO as well or not. Bearing in mind the need to avoid over-optimization, we’d say you should only add captions where it would make sense to the visitor for one to be there. Think about the visitor first, and don’t add a caption just for image SEO purposes.

alt text and title text

The alt text (or alt tag) is added to an image so there will be descriptive text in place if the image can’t be displayed to the visitor for any reason. We can’t put it any better than Wikipedia:

“In situations where the image is not available to the reader, perhaps because they have turned off images in their web browser or are using a screen reader due to a visual impairment, the alternative text ensures that no information or functionality is lost.”

Be sure to add alt text to every image you use, and make sure the alt text includes the SEO keyphrase for that page (if appropriate). Most importantly, describe what’s in the image so both search engines and people can make sense of it. The more relevant information surrounding an image has, the more search engines deem this image important.

When hovering over an image, some browsers show the title text as a ‘tooltip’. Chrome shows the title text as was intended. Title text for images is similar and a lot of people who use titles simply copy the alt text, but more and more people leave them out altogether. Why is that? Here’s Mozilla’s take:

title has a number of accessibility problems, mainly based around the fact that screen reader support is very unpredictable and most browsers won’t show it unless you are hovering with a mouse (so e.g. no access to keyboard users).”

It is better to include such supporting information in the main article text, rather than attached to the image.

Read more: Read more about alt tag and title tag optimization »

Add image structured data

Adding structured data to your pages can help search engines display your images as rich results. While Google says structured data doesn’t help you rank better, it does help to achieve a more fleshed out listing in Image Search. There’s more, though. For instance, if you have recipes on your site and you add structured data to your images Google can also add a badge to your images showing that this image belongs to a recipe. Google Images supports structured data for the following types:

  • Product
  • Video
  • Recipe
Searching for Yoast SEO Premium in Google Images turns up the product label for our plugin product page

Google has a number of guidelines you need to follow if you want your images to appear rich in image search. For one, when specifying an image as a structured data property, make sure that the image actually belongs to the instance of that type. In addition, your image should have the image attribute and that your images should be crawlable and indexable. You can find them all Google’s Structured Data General Guidelines.

Yoast SEO automatically adds the correct structured data a number of images on your site, like your logo or the ones you add to your how-to articles built in our blocks. The plugin always finds at least one relevant image on any page to add to the structured data graph. This way, Yoast SEO can describe your page properly to search engines. Want to learn more about structured data? Enroll in our free Structured data training course if you want to learn how to add structured data to your pages!

OpenGraph and Twitter Cards

Earlier on, we mentioned using images for social sharing. If you add the following image tag to the <head> section in your page HTML like this:

<meta property="og:image" content="http://example.com/link-to-image.jpg" />

That will make sure the image is included in your share on Facebook (and OpenGraph is also used for Pinterest, for instance).

post-to-facebook

Our Yoast SEO plugin has a Social section where you can set and – in the Premium version – even preview your Facebook and Twitter posts. Premium users can also use the Zapier integration to automate posting to social media platforms. Make sure to use a high-quality image, like the original image you used in the post, as the social platforms use higher quality/larger images more often than not. If you have set this up correctly, and it’s not showing the right image, try to flush Facebook’s cache in the URL Debugger. Twitter Cards do the same for Twitter and are also generated by our plugin.

Alignment

This is one of my pet peeves: Images should never break the left reading line. I’m sure there are studies backing this up, but for me it’s personal. I just really don’t like it when text starts to the right of an image, only to jump to the left the next image down:

Maintain the left reading line; don't align images to the left
Maintain the left reading line; don’t align images to the left

If you use an image at the same width as your text column, that’s fine and it will even help emphasize the image more.

I’ll be honest: this has absolutely nothing to do with image SEO, but I saw the chance to express my opinion and used it! I think it’s bad for user experience. So, just to please me: don’t do this. Thanks, I really appreciate it.

XML image sitemaps

If you are a web developer, you might wonder about XML image sitemaps. I’d prefer to describe this as images in XML sitemaps. Google is clear about this:

Additionally, you can use Google image extensions for sitemaps to give Google more information about the images available on your pages. Image sitemap information helps Google discover images that we might not otherwise find (such as images your site reaches with JavaScript code), and allows you to indicate images on your site that you want Google to crawl and index.

Every now and then, people ask us about XML image sitemaps. We don’t generate these in our plugin, but follow Google’s advice and include them in the page or post sitemaps. Just scroll down in our post sitemap and you’ll see we have added images to all our latest posts (there is a column just for that). Adding images to your XML sitemaps helps Google index your images, so be sure to do so for better image SEO.

Serving images via an image CDN

We all know CDNs as one of the most popular site speed optimizations. Some of the companies that provide CDNs also have a specific CDN for images. The image CDNs are built around basic tasks: to optimize your images and get them to your visitor as fast as possible. Running an image CDN can speed up the delivery of your images many, many times.

An image CDN lets you handle the transformation, optimization and delivery of images. You can determine what loads when and how that should work. For instance, you can say that all your PNG images should be converted to webp on-the-fly because these load fastest and give the best image quality. An image CDN has loads of options to fine-tune the process, but there’s often a default setting that’s probably best for the majority of sites.

There are loads of image CDNs to choose from, like Sirv, Cloudinary and Imagekit. Also, platforms like Cloudflare let you determine how to resize, reformat and serve images.

Image SEO: summary

Image SEO is the sum of a number of elements. With Google getting better at recognizing elements in images every day, it makes sense to make sure the image and all its elements contribute to a good user experience as well as SEO. It would be foolish to try to kid Google.

Keep these things in mind when adding an image to an article:

  • Use a relevant image that matches your text
  • Pick a good file name for your image
  • Make sure image dimensions match the image size as displayed
  • Use srcset if possible
  • Reduce file size for faster loading
  • Add a caption, if appropriate, for easier scanning of the page
  • Use image alt text. No need for a title text
  • Add structured data to your images
  • Add OpenGraph and Twitter Card tags for the image
  • Don’t break the left reading line with an image – align images right or center
  • Use images in your XML sitemaps
  • Serving images via a CDN
  • Provide all the context you can!

Besides contributing to SEO and user experience, images can also play an important role in conversion. So don’t underestimate the importance of image SEO on your site!

Keep reading: WordPress SEO: The definitive guide to higher rankings for WordPress sites »

The post Image SEO: Optimizing images for search engines appeared first on Yoast.

Whether you’re a blogger or write articles for an online magazine or newspaper, chances are you’ll find yourself asking whether your article needs an image or not. The answer is always “Yes”. Images bring an article to life and also contribute to your website’s SEO. This post explains how to fully optimize an image for SEO and
The post Image SEO: Optimizing images for search engines appeared first on Yoast.Read MoreContent SEO, Image SEO

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Black Friday Statistics 2020: Key Trends and Shifts Marketers Should Know

Black Friday Statistics 2020: Key Trends and Shifts Marketers Should Know

We analyzed the biggest ecommerce websites, most popular Black Friday product categories, products, and brands to uncover the latest trends and shifts in consumer online behaviour which may affect Black Friday 2020 deals.

We analyzed the biggest ecommerce websites, most popular Black Friday product categories, products, and brands to uncover the latest trends and shifts in consumer online behaviour which may affect Black Friday 2020 deals.Read MoreeCommerce, Research, Data StudiesSEMrush blog

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Daily SEO Fix: Collecting, Organizing, and Tracking Keywords with Moz Pro

Posted by KerryDuggan

So we meet again, keyword research…

Now more than ever, we’re depending on the online world for our day-to-day activities. We’re making use of the web for learning and studying, shopping, paying bills, and for the majority of our entertainment and social needs. This means the need for search engines to provide us with what we’re looking for has never been more relevant.

Google’s algorithm focuses on how to fulfill search intent, and we want Google to see us doing that. We know the accuracy and relevancy of content is imperative so Google thinks we’re the answer to the searcher’s query.

I lead Moz’s onboarding team in Ireland, and keywords are our most discussed topic in one-on-one walkthroughs — you all want to know how to find the best keywords, if you are currently using the most relevant keywords, and what keywords your competitors are using. The Moz Pro tool shows us all this and more.

Book a Moz Pro Walkthrough

We want our customers to know the most effective ways to use Moz Pro to get keyword data, so we’ve put together these Daily Fix videos to help you do just that! I would love to hear your opinion on fulfilling search intent and what has yielded good results for your website, so speak to you in the comments section!

Keyword suggestions groups

Is there any way to find keywords that have a similar meaning or are broadly related in meaning so I can focus on similar keywords? How can I see the volume of a group of similar keywords?

In this Daily Fix, Emilie guides you through how to use the “Grouped keywords” filter in the Keyword Explorer tool.

The “Grouped keywords” filter gives you an idea of the volume for your area of interest, rather than focusing solely on the volume of one keyword.

Content suggestions

Does Moz have anything to help me create better content relating to my keywords, or to help me start my keyword competitive analysis?

In this Daily Fix, Megan shows us how to use the content suggestions section in the Page Optimization tool to help build better content in relation to your keyword topic.

This can also help you get ideas for keywords to research based on the content suggestions provided.

This section is based on a specific URL and keyword pairing, and shows other keywords commonly found in the highly-ranked search results which contain your initial keyword.

Keyword opportunities

What keywords am I ranking for that I’m not aware of?

What if I start ranking for other keywords after I create my campaign, does Moz track this data?

In this Daily Fix, Emilie explains how to find keywords that may be sending your site traffic, and for which your site is already ranking but you’re not tracking.

Click on the “Track” button to add these opportunities to your campaign, and start collecting data to see where you’re ranking for each keyword.

Finding ranking keywords

How do I know what I’m already ranking for?

How can I see what keywords my competitors are ranking for?

In this Daily Fix, I demonstrate how to find any website’s ranking keywords. You can see your website’s ranking keywords, or find those of competitors. You can also see pages associated with ranking positions, which will help with content ideas.

Having this information allows you to start your competitor analysis. You can use your keyword list feature and have a list for each competitor to get a better understanding of potential keyword opportunities available to you. 

The keyword list overview helps to compare metrics across groups of keywords, which will help you see low hanging fruit.

Filtering keywords

Can Moz give me suggestions of keywords I might not have thought of? How do I know what questions my customers could be asking?

In this Daily Fix, Michael shows you how to use the suggestions filter in Keyword Explorer to find useful keywords. This can be a great source for content suggestions, example ideas for your blog, or potential FAQs on your website.

It can also help you find topics that are related to your keyword so you can provide the content your customers really want to see.


Want to try the Moz Pro tool? First sign up for our 30 day free trial and then book a walkthrough with one of our onboarding specialists.

We would love to hear about your SEO goals and how we can help!

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!

Posted by KerryDugganSo we meet again, keyword research…
Now more than ever, we’re depending on the online world for our day-to-day activities. We’re making use of the web for learning and studying, shopping, paying bills, and for the majority of our entertainment and social needs. This means the need for search engines to provide us with what we’re looking for has never been more relevant.
Google’s algorithm focuses on how to fulfill search intent, and we want Google to see us doing that. We know the accuracy and relevancy of content is imperative so Google thinks we’re the answer to the searcher’s query.
I lead Moz’s onboarding team in Ireland, and keywords are our most discussed topic in one-on-one walkthroughs — you all want to know how to find the best keywords, if you are currently using the most relevant keywords, and what keywords your competitors are using. The Moz Pro tool shows us all this and more.

Book a Moz Pro Walkthrough

We want our customers to know the most effective ways to use Moz Pro to get keyword data, so we’ve put together these Daily Fix videos to help you do just that! I would love to hear your opinion on fulfilling search intent and what has yielded good results for your website, so speak to you in the comments section!
Keyword suggestions groups

Is there any way to find keywords that have a similar meaning or are broadly related in meaning so I can focus on similar keywords? How can I see the volume of a group of similar keywords?
In this Daily Fix, Emilie guides you through how to use the “Grouped keywords” filter in the Keyword Explorer tool.
The “Grouped keywords” filter gives you an idea of the volume for your area of interest, rather than focusing solely on the volume of one keyword.
Content suggestions

Does Moz have anything to help me create better content relating to my keywords, or to help me start my keyword competitive analysis?
In this Daily Fix, Megan shows us how to use the content suggestions section in the Page Optimization tool to help build better content in relation to your keyword topic.
This can also help you get ideas for keywords to research based on the content suggestions provided.
This section is based on a specific URL and keyword pairing, and shows other keywords commonly found in the highly-ranked search results which contain your initial keyword.
Keyword opportunities

What keywords am I ranking for that I’m not aware of?
What if I start ranking for other keywords after I create my campaign, does Moz track this data?
In this Daily Fix, Emilie explains how to find keywords that may be sending your site traffic, and for which your site is already ranking but you’re not tracking.
Click on the “Track” button to add these opportunities to your campaign, and start collecting data to see where you’re ranking for each keyword.
Finding ranking keywords

How do I know what I’m already ranking for?
How can I see what keywords my competitors are ranking for?
In this Daily Fix, I demonstrate how to find any website’s ranking keywords. You can see your website’s ranking keywords, or find those of competitors. You can also see pages associated with ranking positions, which will help with content ideas.
Having this information allows you to start your competitor analysis. You can use your keyword list feature and have a list for each competitor to get a better understanding of potential keyword opportunities available to you. 
The keyword list overview helps to compare metrics across groups of keywords, which will help you see low hanging fruit.
Filtering keywords

Can Moz give me suggestions of keywords I might not have thought of? How do I know what questions my customers could be asking?
In this Daily Fix, Michael shows you how to use the suggestions filter in Keyword Explorer to find useful keywords. This can be a great source for content suggestions, example ideas for your blog, or potential FAQs on your website.
It can also help you find topics that are related to your keyword so you can provide the content your customers really want to see.

Want to try the Moz Pro tool? First sign up for our 30 day free trial and then book a walkthrough with one of our onboarding specialists.
We would love to hear about your SEO goals and how we can help! Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!Read MoreThe Moz Blog

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