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Duplicate Content: SEO Best Practices to Avoid it

Duplicate Content: SEO Best Practices to Avoid it

Duplicate content is defined as content that is an exact copy of content found elsewhere. However, the term duplicate content can also refer to almost identical content (such as just swapping a product, brand name, or location name only). In this guide, I’ll look deeper into the causes of duplicate content within a site architecture and the best ways to avoid it.

Duplicate content is defined as content that is an exact copy of content found elsewhere. However, the term duplicate content can also refer to almost identical content (such as just swapping a product, brand name, or location name only). In this guide, I’ll look deeper into the causes of duplicate content within a site architecture and the best ways to avoid it.Read MoreSEOSemrush blog

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Optimize product images for your online store

Product images can make or break your online shop’s success. You can hire the best designer in the world to create a killer design, but when images are bad, sales will be bad. It’s the first thing a customer will look at. In this post, we’ll go over a number of things you need to consider when adding product images to your e-commerce site.

The importance of good images

Over the years, there’ve been many studies that show the online consumer values high-quality product images. Customers trust credible online stores to have a way to view or experience the product online. They want to see product in all available colors and from all different angles. Online shoppers can’t touch the product so they have get everything they need from your description, images and videos. So, they better be good!

And in the year of the pandemic, the surge in online shopping has made it shoppers even more aware of good product information and images. With shops closed, they need to be able to see your products in the best light on your site.

Recent research from Periscope (a McKinsey brand), shows that many shoppers make the move to online for the first time. What they value most is good product descriptions and clear images.

“The need for informative product descriptions and clear product images at a time when consumers couldn’t see, feel or test products in a store ranked as one of the top three factors for a great online browsing experience in all the countries we surveyed, increasing in importance by 12 to 23% from pre- to post-shutdown.”

Not just for people, but for machines as well

Today, great images aren’t just consumed by people but machines as well. Increasingly, search engines and other platforms can ‘read’ images to make sense of what’s on them. As a result, they can provide you with a search result. So, you could take a photo of a cool pair of shoes your friend bought and have the search engine tell you where they came from and what they cost. Or, they can do a live translation of a road sign in a foreign language. This is called visual search — and it’s gaining speed!

The technology for this is getting better by the day and machines can read evermore complex images. But here, again, clear images of high-quality is increasing the chance of a machine understanding the image.

Product images set a mood

Product images are a big part of every type of online store. But sometime, you find e-commerce site with big images that just don’t do justice to the products the company sells. The images of the featured products simply don’t ‘pop’. If you want to stand out for the thousands of other stores, your photography needs to do that as well.

One of the things you could try is to use photos of people using the product. Or the product in use. It doesn’t matter if you sell coffee machines or dresses. If you add people, your product will look friendlier and people will see themselves using your products.

product-image-in-use-ikea__1_
A bed in a fully furnished room or a basic, empty stock photo? What’s more enticing?

In the photo above, we’ve combined two images of the same bed to demonstrate what you can do with your photos. See the difference? That Ikea bed is much more appealing when it appears in a room — you can easily imagine how it will fit in your own room. Ikea does an awesome job in this, both in their magazines, on their website and in their stores. Product images like this are becoming more and more common, so be sure you’re not the last one to do this!

Using product images with the products in use works best, because people will be able to see themselves using that product. It’s as close as you can get to an in-store experience. People want to buy the product online, but an image will never replace picking a product up, looking at it from all angles or trying it on. We need to try to give our customers that same experience. You can even add small videos to present your products in another way, or to demonstrate certain features.

Quality of your product images

It seems so obvious to use high quality images. But we have been telling you to reduce the file size for years, right? First of all, that doesn’t mean you have to use a crappy, blurred image of just a few kBs. The tools mentioned in our image SEO article don’t reduce the quality of an image, for instance. They remove meta / Exif data and things like that, but your image will still look awesome. Plus, browsers can now work with a number of new image formats (like WebP) that provide drastically better quality images at a smaller size. And WordPress can now lazy load your images, so your site won’t load all the images at once — making it appear faster.

Also, internet connections are still getting faster. In many countries, broadband internet is everywhere. That also means people’ll have less difficulties downloading your larger product image files. You’ll need larger images anyway, as that leads us to another necessary feature of online shops: ability to zoom product images.

Ability to zoom

Have you ever picked up a backpack or daypack to inspect the lining? Is it waterproof, does it protect your stuff well? You want to be able to take a closer look at details. That’s what zooming product images is for. But, it’s so annoying when the zoomed image is exactly the same size (or even smaller) than the product image that was already shown. This still happens frequently! A lot of online shops simply import product images from manufacturers (or even download them from other shops that sell the same product) without testing the image first. This ruins user experience.

If there is no proper product image available, create one. Even your iPhone’s camera can provide you with a decent, large image that can serve as a zoomable product image. If you want to DIY your photography, Shopify has a great guide that’ll help create great photos for your online store.

If we look at image sizes, Shopify‘s guide on product images states:

Your product and collection images can be any size up to 4472 x 4472 px, or 20 megapixels. Product and collection images need to have a file size smaller than 20 MB to be added to Shopify. High resolution photos look more polished and professional to your customers. For square product images, a size of 2048 x 2048 px usually looks best

Woocommerce states that the minimum dimensions should be 800×800 pixels. That seems to make sense, as it will perfectly fit most tablets as well without any problem. Smaller will lead to distortion, and we have established you want quality images, right?

Any color you want as long as it is black

Henry Ford wrote in his autobiography “Any customer can have a car painted any color that he wants so long as it is black”. Times have changed. Today, you can get your products in many, many colors. Of course, you need people to show all the different color options in the same way as your ‘main’ color variant.

Bottom line: if you want to buy a blue sweater, you want to be able to see that sweater in that color. Clothing stores like Blue Tomato do this, by not just showing colored squares, but a thumbnail of the product in another color:

This store not only shows the different color options, but also has detailed photos and even a video of the product

Especially for products that consist of one main and a few other colors, this works really well.

Alternate views or products

You want to be able to look at a product from all angles. Let’s look at that Blue Tomato example again. It shows that sweater being used, from the back and front, plus some details. You can really check the sweater from multiple angles.

If you are looking for furniture online, you want to check that chair from multiple angles as well. You want alternate views for the kitchen appliances, even though you’ll hide the dish washer behind a cabinet panel. And let’s take a closer look at the fabric of those drapes, or the back cover of that book. Again, it’s all about replacing the in-store experience.

Zappos does all that and adds a video of (in this case) an employee telling you more about the product itself:

Many sites offer a video of the product in action — and rightly so!

The way that shoe is bent and rotated makes that you really ‘feel’ what kind of shoe that All Star is, so to say.

To wrap things up

If you have an online business selling actual products, you need to make sure to optimize your product images. Your customer will most definitely appreciate that. Make sure to:

  1. use high quality images;
  2. add an option for zoom;
  3. make sure to show the product in all available colors;
  4. provide alternate views of the product.

These are the main things to take into account when optimizing your shop’s images. We trust this article will make you rethink your own product images, or make you realize you are actually doing a pretty nice job!

Read more: Optimizing images for SEO »

The post Optimize product images for your online store appeared first on Yoast.

Product images can make or break your online shop’s success. You can hire the best designer in the world to create a killer design, but when images are bad, sales will be bad. It’s the first thing a customer will look at. In this post, we’ll go over a number of things you need to consider when
The post Optimize product images for your online store appeared first on Yoast.Read MoreeCommerce SEO, Image SEO, User eXperience (UX)

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Mobile-First Indexing: What You Need to Know

We’re in a mobile era. It’s been over five years since the number of mobile searches overtook the number of desktop searches. It makes sense for Google to index and rank content based on the mobile pages since more people

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The post Mobile-First Indexing: What You Need to Know appeared first on SEO Blog by Ahrefs.

We’re in a mobile era. It’s been over five years since the number of mobile searches overtook the number of desktop searches. It makes sense for Google to index and rank content based on the mobile pages since more people…
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The post Mobile-First Indexing: What You Need to Know appeared first on SEO Blog by Ahrefs.Read MoreTechnical SEOSEO Blog by Ahrefs

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How to Build a Site Structure for SEO

How to Build a Site Structure for SEO

Don‘t underestimate the importance of getting your site‘s structure right and the impact that it can have on your SEO performance, and in this guide, we take a deep dive into how to structure your site, walking through a step-by-step process as well as helping you to see what an ideal site structure looks like.

Don‘t underestimate the importance of getting your site‘s structure right and the impact that it can have on your SEO performance, and in this guide, we take a deep dive into how to structure your site, walking through a step-by-step process as well as helping you to see what an ideal site structure looks like.Read MoreSEOSemrush blog

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What is content marketing?

Content marketing consists of all marketing activities that focus on the creation and sharing of information. If you’re serious about your SEO, it should definitely be part of your strategy. But nowadays, it’s also crucial for branding. Sharing valuable information is a great way to attract an audience and show them that you’re an expert in what you do. In this post, I’ll explain what content marketing is, why it’s important for SEO and how you can set up your own strategy!

Table of contents

What is content marketing?

Content marketing comes down to sharing valuable and relevant content with your audience. Free content that helps them solve their problems or understand more about a topic they’re interested in. Your audience will benefit from the information and will perceive you and your company as experts in a particular field. In the end, your expertise will be the reason why people will buy your products or services. And probably the reason they will keep coming back to your site.

Types of content marketing

A first example of content marketing is a blog where you regularly post new articles on topics in your field of expertise. This can also be the easiest way for you to start. At Yoast, content marketing is one of the main things we do. We share our knowledge on our SEO blog and make sure to also share this on social media and in our newsletter.

To be able to help all our users we write articles for people new to SEO, such as what is SEO? and articles for people with a bit more experience, such as our article on Google’s NLP model BERT. And although it might feel contradictory, sharing our knowledge on SEO has a very positive effect on the sales of our online SEO courses. Our audience perceives us as experts (probably through all the content we share) and is willing to pay money to get access to more of that knowledge.

In addition to a blog, there are lots of other forms of content marketing you could look into. For example, some sites choose to create E-books, informative videos, quizzes, apps, podcasts, and even events. All with a focus on sharing valuable information on a subject that their audience is interested in. And valuable information means that it’s in-depth, educational, and preferably unique. So that does mean that creating this content needs time and should be an ongoing process where you keep updating it when necessary.

Why is content marketing important?

As we just discussed, creating valuable information that you offer for free is the very essence of content marketing. So why are we telling you to create content to give it away for free?

Trust and expertise are essential

The web has given us a whole new way to get in touch with new people, discover new companies and even make our decisions. You probably do it yourself too. Online research before you make your decision on something, from getting a cat to purchasing a new laptop. As new competitors pop up every day, users become more critical about where and what they buy. Their decision on where to buy their products is increasingly based on their trust in and relationship with a company. A well-thought-out content marketing strategy can help you build a strong relationship with your audience, based on expertise and trust.

An example of how this works

Say you’re looking for a new laptop and you’re not quite sure which one to get. You might search for ‘how to choose a laptop’ and get shops that lead you directly to their laptops. However, you’ll also get sites that offer you a laptop buying guide that helps you decide which laptop is the best fit for you. By asking you questions on what you’re looking for, but also giving you easy-to-understand information on what the differences are between their laptops. Would you prefer going directly to a list of more than 100 laptops or go to a page that helps you filter the right ones?

The laptop buying guide above is a great example of content that helps a user with their question. And with it, gains their trust in their products. This shows you how powerful content marketing can be to build a great relationship with your audience. You could compare it to a shop assistant in an offline shop. If a shop assistant is friendly and takes their time helping you, this makes for a much better user experience than if they point you to their selection of laptops without saying much more than good morning. That’s why you should also think about your tone of voice and use storytelling in the content you create.

It’s beneficial to your SEO

In addition to creating trust and building a relationship with your audience, content marketing helps you with your search engine optimization (SEO). An important part of SEO is writing quality content, focused on your users. Because your users aren’t the only ones reading your content, Google and other search engines also read your text to decide when to show your pages in the search results. If you’re new to the world of SEO, consider using our Yoast SEO plugin that takes care of a lot of the technical SEO stuff to roll out the red carpet for search engines.

If content marketing is an integral part of your marketing efforts and you work on creating quality content, you will likely write a lot of content related to the terms your audience is searching for. Your website will start to pop up more and more often, as you write more blog posts. Overall, your rankings will go up. And, all of these new visitors are potential buyers. So, in addition to increasing traffic, content marketing could increase your sales as well.

Read more: What is quality content and how do you create it? »

How do you set up your strategy?

First of all, you need to start with keyword research to make sure you’re writing about the right things. This doesn’t mean you can’t write about what you want, but it can help you use the same words as your (potential) customers. Which is important, as this will help them find your content. Conduct your keyword research to create a list of keywords or keyphrases that you can write about. After you’ve created this list and decided on the priority of these keywords, you can start planning.

Create a realistic planning

Be realistic in how many blogs you and your team can write per week or month, as it is important to spend enough time on your content. Make sure to create an editorial calendar, sit down with your team of authors, and brainstorm about who wants to write what. And from what angle, to make sure you’re sending unique content into the world. Also, keep an eye on the variation in what you write about and leave room in your planning to write about last-minute news that you can’t plan ahead on. A well-thought-out content planning can really help you stay on top of your content marketing.

Choose your cornerstone content

Make sure to think about cornerstone content when you are setting up a new content marketing strategy. You should have about 4 or 5 articles that are invaluable to you, your company and your audience. These articles should be informative posts or pages. When you have written these articles, you should write tons of other blog posts about topics similar to these cornerstone articles. Make sure though, you write each of these new blog posts from another angle or about another subtopic. And don’t forget to link to your cornerstone articles from these blog posts.

Keep reading: What type of content should a cornerstone article be? »

Think about your site structure

Now that you’re starting to create more content, it’s important to think about the effect this will have on your site structure. Creating (or keeping) a clear site structure helps your users find their way to the information they’re looking for. The same goes for Google and other search engines. So, this is important from both a usability and SEO point of view. Check out our ultimate guide on site structure to review the structure of your site and what improvements you can make when it comes to all of this new content you’re creating.

Keep your content fresh

I wish I could tell you otherwise, but hitting publish on your well-written blog post doesn’t mean you should never look at it again. For both your users and rankings, it’s important to revisit your existing content from time to time. This way you can keep your content fresh and up to date, by making the necessary changes to keep it relevant. Make these updates of your existing content part of your content planning and make sure to do this on a regular basis for your most popular blog posts and pages.

If you’re using WordPress our Yoast SEO Premium plugin can help you with all the steps mentioned above. By warning you when you need to update your cornerstone content, providing you with internal linking suggestions, easily redirecting old URLs to new ones and much more! A subscription to Yoast SEO Premium also gives you full access to our academy courses, such as our course on SEO copywriting, site structure and keyword research.

Buy Yoast SEO Premium now!

Unlock powerful features and much more for your WordPress site with the Yoast SEO Premium plugin!

Get Yoast SEO Premium Only $89 USD $66.75 USD (ex VAT) for 1 site

Content is the way to go

In this blog post, we discussed what content marketing is and why you should consider creating your own content strategy. Which in a way, is a great example of content marketing itself. I hope this article has provided you with valuable information that helped answer your question, as this is the essence of content marketing.

I would like to once again stress the importance of creating enough space for content marketing and remember that this is a long-term strategy. So it will take some time to become the number one search result! But this will definitely be worth it in the long run, so get started with your content planning right now:

Read on: Content planning for a blog 6 easy-to-use tips »

The post What is content marketing? appeared first on Yoast.

Content marketing consists of all marketing activities that focus on the creation and sharing of information. If you’re serious about your SEO, it should definitely be part of your strategy. But nowadays, it’s also crucial for branding. Sharing valuable information is a great way to attract an audience and show them that you’re an expert in what
The post What is content marketing? appeared first on Yoast.Read MoreBranding, Content SEO, SEO Basics, SEO Copywriting

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Set Your Sights on These Rising Social Media Trends in 2021

COVID-19 has drastically changed the way people utilize social media. With a 74% rise in social media marketing spend during the pandemic, marketers are investing more money in social media marketing. They expect to spend the same, if not more, in the coming year.

To make sure you’re getting the most out of your social media marketing spend, you need to understand what social media trends have seen a recent spike — and are likely to continue surging in 2021.

Gen Z Buys With Its Values

Gen Z is becoming a more important target audience for social media marketing as they enter adulthood. The content Gen Zers consume needs to reflect their current tastes.

One of the most unique things about Gen Z is their world outlook; they often see themselves as global citizens. Gen Zers care about what’s going on in the world because they’re more connected to it than any other generation before them. As the aptly nicknamed “iGeneration,” they’re the first generation to have grown up with smartphones and social media easily at their disposal.

That also means their brand outlook is different. In fact, 68% of Gen Zers “expect brands to contribute to society.” That means your social media channels should display what your brand is doing in that respect. Generally speaking, Gen Zers want to see brands that care about equality and the environment, and need those values prominently displayed on social media in order for them to engage.

This socially responsible mindset also drives Gen Zers to strive for inclusivity. The problem? They aren’t seeing enough of it on social media — 71% of Gen Zers say they want ads to have more diversity. Ensuring that different cultures and genders are appropriately represented is a great place to start. Your social media efforts as a brand should reflect your desire to include people from all walks of life.

Another key piece of the social media puzzle for Gen Z is giving them options. Remember, they didn’t grow up with TV as their only form of information and entertainment. They’ve had access to smartphones, tablets, laptops, and more — all from a very young age. Being on one social media platform simply won’t do the trick. Picking a few different social media networks where you can cater to Gen Z is a must. Younger generations are constantly toggling between different apps and social media channels. It’s your job to make sure you’re right there with them when they decide to make the jump from Instagram to TikTok.

TikTok Becomes a Major Social Media Player

Speaking of TikTok, the video-sharing social network has become one of the most successful social media channels during the pandemic. Much of the platform’s fun and lighthearted content has connected with social media users of all ages, but particularly Gen Z.

Consider this: TikTok saw nearly 100% growth in the United States in 2019, and the average time spent on TikTok per user in the United States in September 2019 was nearly 500 minutes.

TikTok has also continued to produce a number of viral videos over the course of the pandemic. A recent example is TikTok user Doggface208 and a video he posted riding his skateboard while sipping cranberry juice and lip-syncing to Fleetwood Mac.

social media trends tiktok doggfaceSource: Daily Dot

Doggface208’s viral sensation caught the attention of Ocean Spray (the brand of cranberry juice he was drinking in the video). The brand gifted the Idaho potato warehouse worker a brand new truck for inadvertently promoting their juice unlike any other influencer has been able to do for them. Bottles of the same cran-raspberry juice Doggface208 drank in the video flew off shelves shortly after the video went viral.

Health organizations have also taken notice of TikTok’s youth influence. The World Health Organization (WHO) has 2.6 million followers on the platform, and they’re using it to spread information about COVID-19. The goal is to get more young people aware of the pandemic dangers on a platform they’re using regularly.

In terms of advertising, TikTok is still a work-in-progress. Ads on the platform are beginning to pop up more, but they’re still relatively sparse compared to the likes of Facebook and Instagram. On average, TikTok ads clock in at around $10 per 1,000 impressions (CPM) vs. Instagram, which only has a CPM of about $8. While impressions come at a higher average cost, there’s still very little competition on the platform and a big opportunity to advertise more for brands in 2021.

Influencers Are Driving Social Commerce

People are using social media to connect with more brands from home and shopping from their laptops and phones. The role of influencers in that sales process has been amplified by the pandemic.

Social commerce is bigger than ever, and 34% of Americans say they have shopped on Instagram due to a recommendation from an influencer. As the pandemic continues to keep more people at home, you can expect that number to rise in 2021. Social media influencers are becoming increasingly important as salespeople. Marketers should be reaching out to influencers for paid partnerships that can help boost their product visibility and brand awareness.

The continued rise of micro-influencers is also important. Not every brand will have the digital marketing budget to bring on a big-name influencer to promote marketing campaigns and new products. Micro-influencers can be a more affordable alternative with smaller but equally loyal audiences. Influencer marketing doesn’t necessarily have to mean hiring Kylie Jenner to feature your brand on her Instagram stories.

Social media influencers are also becoming increasingly important in relaying health messages to younger audiences during the pandemic. The UK government hired influencers to help relay COVD-19 safety messages to young people using the platform. This trend will likely continue in 2021 as the pandemic continues to be part of our everyday lives.

Brands Are Showing More Empathy

With so much uncertainty in today’s world, many brands are taking an empathetic approach to their social media efforts. They recognize people are going through difficult times and using their brand voices to address those concerns.

As COVID-19 anxiety grew over the course of 2020, a number of ecommerce brands began creating customized content that addressed the pandemic.

social media trends glossier instagram

Source: Instagram

In the example above, the beauty brand Glossier chose a humorous approach to quarantine with a short-form video. They also talked directly to their active users and asked them what they wanted to see to make them feel better. Having that genuine open line of communication with followers is more important than ever to see how they’re feeling as a collective audience.

You can be creating content that addresses mental health issues, pandemic fatigue, and even social connection heading into 2021. Your followers want to know that there are real people behind your brand going through the same things they are. Nothing about 2020 has been “business as usual,” and your social media strategy needs to reflect that.

That also means taking more time in the social media creation process. Take time to think before posting. Ensure your content isn’t alienating members of your target audience who may be going through serious health or financial hardships. Showing a little heart can go a long way in making your audience less isolated and alone during challenging times.

Stay on Top of Social Media Trends

These social media trends will continue to find their way into the mainstream consciousness in 2021, especially with no immediate end to the pandemic in sight. Understanding these trends now can set your brand up for future success.

If you want to get more insight into 2020 content trends, Alexa’s Content Exploration tool has you covered. It can help you find relevant and timely topics to cover in your social media posts that other brands might not even be focusing on yet. You can find low-competition opportunities and content gaps easier than ever before.

Try our free 14-day trial today to get access to all these great content insights and more.

The post Set Your Sights on These Rising Social Media Trends in 2021 appeared first on Alexa Blog.

COVID-19 has drastically changed the way people utilize social media. With a 74% rise in social media marketing spend during the pandemic, marketers are investing more money in social media marketing. They expect to spend the same, if not more, in the coming year. To make sure you’re getting the most out of your social […]
The post Set Your Sights on These Rising Social Media Trends in 2021 appeared first on Alexa Blog.Read MoreContent MarketingAlexa Blog

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The Local SEO Stats & Practical Tactics of Google’s Top-Ranked Grocery Stores

Posted by MiriamEllis

Grocery stores belong at the center of the 2021 local SEO industry conversation.

Other than medical facilities, no enterprise stands out more clearly on the map as essential to daily life in the US, and few verticals have had to adapt more rapidly in mid-flight than our neighborhood food stores in the COVID-19 era. From independent grocers to major supermarket chains, there are heroes in every aisle keeping the nation fed. Any data that supports the strong continuance of these businesses is well worth sharing.

In this article, I’ll provide results from 900 data points I pulled while analyzing the top local-pack-ranked grocery store in each of the 50 US capital cities. I’ll also summarize the practical tactics I’ve learned from listening to grocers and their marketers, highlighting how they’re adapting and succeeding in unprecedented times.

It’s my hope that both in-house and agency grocery marketers will discover important takeaways in my analysis to ensure a successful 2021 for each vital store.

Methodology

I manually queried Google for “grocery store”, modified with the city name of each of the 50 US capital cities. I was not physically located in any of the cities where I searched, which should exclude the influence of user-to-business proximity. In a spreadsheet, I manually recorded 18 characteristics for each of the winning grocery stores, and then drew my statistics from this data.

The GMB characteristics of top-ranked grocery stores

Review these statististics to assess how a grocery store you’re marketing measures up.

Location within city limits

100% of the grocery stores ranking #1 had a physical location within the city limits of the specified search phrase city. No shop, however strong, was getting the number one spot in the local pack if it wasn’t within the city.

Takeaway: Having a location within city limits correlates with a good chance of ranking for searches that contain that city’s name.

Keywords in business title

Only 6% of the top-ranked businesses had business titles that matched any part of my search phrases. This was good to see, given Google’s known (and unfortunate) rewarding of brands that stuff keywords into their business titles in violation of Google’s guidelines. I saw only one business that had extraneous keywords in its title.

Takeaway: You don’t need to spam Google with keywords in your business title to rank as a top grocery store.

Brand diversity

No one brand is winning the top spot across the country. Results were extremely diverse, and made up of a vibrant mix of independent grocers and large chains. Some brands were winning out in more than one state, however. Safeway won five local packs, Whole Foods won four, and Hy-Vee and Hannaford each won three. Beyond this, brands were very varied.

Takeaway: Any brand, large or small, can compete for premium local visibility. No one brand has a monopoly on rankings.

Page Authority of GMB landing page

Page Authority (PA) is a 100-point score developed by Moz that predicts how well a specific website page will rank within search engine results. PA is believed to exert a strong influence on local pack rankings.

Examining the PA of the website landing page linked to from each grocery store’s Google My Business listing, I found that the average PA was 40. The highest PA was 58 and the lowest was 26. Five of the top-ranked supermarkets had no website link at all, amazingly, and this must be a source of mystery and frustration for lower-ranked grocery stores in these cities with GMB listings that do link to their websites.

Takeaway: An average PA of 40 is not prohibitively high. Using Moz Pro to measure competitive PA and actively seeking relevant local links for each location of a grocery brand can help you beat out sleepier competitors. When low PA or even a missing website link are still being rewarded with a high ranking for a competitor of the brand you’re marketing, it’s time to conduct a local business audit to discover which other local search ranking factors might be at play.

Primary GMB category

82% of top-ranked grocery stores use “grocery store” as their primary category. The remainder of brands had chosen a few other categories, like “supermarket” or “organic food store”. The primary category chosen for the GMB listing is believed to have the most impact on which terms the business ranks for in Google’s local packs.

Takeaway: “Grocery store” has a much higher estimated monthly search volume than any other keyword phrase I investigated, such as “supermarket” or “food store”. Grocers wishing to rank for this top term are best off choosing “grocery store” as their primary GMB category.

Rating

The average rating of top-ranked grocery stores is 4.2 stars. The highest rated market had 4.7 stars, and the lowest had 3.6. Star ratings are believed to influence local rank.

Takeaway: No top-ranked grocery store had a perfect 5-star rating. Don’t be overly concerned about the occasional negative review, but do aim for customer satisfaction that yields ratings in the 4-star range, cumulatively.

Review count

Grocery stores receive a massive number of reviews, and review counts are believed to influence rank. Overall, the 50 grocery stores I analyzed had received a total of 62,415 reviews, indicating just how common usage of Google as a dominant consumer review platform has become.

The average review count per store location is 1,248. The count for the most-reviewed grocery store in my data set is 3,632. The fewest reviews a top-ranked store received is 227. Bear in mind that the reviews each store location needs to achieve maximum visibility will be predicated on their unique geographic market and level of competition.

Takeaway: The fact that the overwhelming majority of reviews I saw are unmanaged (have no brand responses) leads me to believe that professional review acquisition campaigns aren’t likely the force driving the high number of total reviews in the grocery industry. Rather, I’d suggest that Americans are self-motivated to review the places they shop for food. Nevertheless, if a brand you’re marketing is being outranked by a competitor with more consumer sentiment, launching a formal review acquisition program is a smart bet for impacting rank and improving customer service for a store location.

Review recency

The recency of your reviews signals to Google and consumers whether your business is a place of bustling activity or a bit on the quiet side. It’s long been theorized that review recency might have some impact on rank as a user behavior signal. In my data set, 52% of top-ranked stores had been reviewed within the last day. 46% had received a review within the last week. Only 2% had seen more than a week go by without receiving a new review.

Takeaway: Multiple consumer surveys have found that customers tend to be most interested in your most recent reviews when making a decision about where to shop. If a grocery store location you’re marketing hasn’t been reviewed in weeks or months (or years!), it’s definitely a signal to begin actively asking customers for feedback.

Always remember that your customers are your grocery store’s best sales force. They freely convince one another to shop with your company by dint of what they say about your brand in reviews. A steady stream of recent, positive sentiment is priceless sales copy for your market.

Owner responses to reviews in 2020

Making use of Google’s owner response function on the reviews a grocery store receives is absolutely basic to providing good customer service. However, in my data set, 60% of top-ranked grocery stores had not responded to a single review in 2020, and of the 40% that had responded to some reviews, not one brand had responded to all of their reviews.

Takeaway: While ignoring reviews appears to have had no negative impact on grocery stores’ ability to achieve top local pack rankings, I can’t emphasize enough what a waste of opportunity is happening in this vertical.

Every review is a customer starting a conversation with a brand, whether their goal is to thank the business or to complain in hopes of receiving help. Ignoring the majority of conversations customers are starting must be extremely deleterious to consumer satisfaction and reputation. 2020 was a year like no other, and grocers have had their hands full adapting and surviving, but going forward, supermarkets that allocate resources to responding to every review will have an incredible customer experience edge over less-engaged competitors.

Place topics

Google excerpts common topics from the body of each store’s reviews and puts them at the top of the review display. 40% of top-ranked grocery stores have “produce” as their most-mentioned place topic, and it was also present for many, many other stores even if it wasn’t their #1 topic. 6% have “organic” and another 6% have “to go” as the most-talked about element, but beyond this, place topics are greatly varied. This area of Google’s interface is sprinkled with terms like “clean”, “cashier”, “deals”, “sales”, and many other words.

Takeaway: I’m not yet convinced of the usefulness or ultimate staying power of this aspect of Google’s review displays. However, it provides very shorthand sentiment analysis for grocers and marketers wanting an at-a-glance idea of what customers are saying in reviews for a brand and its competitors. You need to drill down into the text of the reviews, though, to see whether frequent mentions of something like “clean” are from customers saying a business is or isn’t clean. Place topics just aren’t terribly sophisticated sentiment analysis, at this point.

My data set reveals that Americans are putting premium focus on produce, so one takeaway here is that the quality of your produce department drives consumers to leave reviews. A great produce department could lead to a great rating and great consumer-created content about your market. A disappointing produce section could create the reverse. I also found the prevalence of “organic” place topics revealing, given stats I had seen on the 10X growth in purchases of organic produce between January and March of 2020. There is a clear demand trend here for healthy food that should be informing inventory.

Price attributes

Google places a 1-4 point “$” attribute on many listings as an evaluation of costliness. It’s believed these designations stem, in part, from attribute questions Google asks users, but the overall data set is incomplete. In my sampling, Google only had a price attribute for 42% of the top-ranked grocery stores. Of that number, 76% were marked with the moderate “$$” price attribute.

Takeaway: As I found in my previous piece on The Google Characteristics of America’s Top-Ranked Eateries, neither Google nor consumers tend to consider either the cheapest or most expensive food options to be the most relevant. Concepts of thrift and spendiness differ greatly across the US, but it’s good to know that a modest price evaluation tends to correlate with top local rankings. That seems to be in-step with the current economic picture. The grocery brands you’re marketing don’t need to be the cheapest or the most expensive; the ideal would be delivering good value for a reasonable price.

Google Posts usage before and during COVID-19

Google Posts are a form of microblogging that enables brands to post fresh content to their Google Business Profiles. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, 24% of grocers were publishing Google Posts, but in 2020, only 16% were actively making any use of this feature.

Takeaway: Google offered special COVID-19 post capabilities to businesses in 2020, but top-ranked grocery stores largely ignored this opportunity. Pre-pandemic usage was very meager, with only about a quarter of grocers using Google Posts to boost engagement. The 8% falloff in 2020 may paint a picture of a vertical too preoccupied with other, more urgent priorities to give this feature a try.

Use of Google posts is not believed to impact ranking, and neglect of this feature clearly didn’t hold any of the subjects back from achieving top rankings, but if a brand you’re marketing can allocate resources to this type of publishing, it’s worth trying. Moz Local can help you publish Google Posts to your listings, and increase the opportunities for consumers to engage with your profiles.

Google Questions & Answers

Google Q&A is a Google Business Profile function that lets a company publish and answer its FAQs, as well as letting the public ask and answer questions. Cumulatively, the fifty grocery stores in my survey have received 1,145 questions. The highest number of questions for a single location is 192, and the lowest is two.

Just 14% of grocers have responded to any of the questions their stores have received, and in no case had a grocery store responded to all of its questions.

Takeaway: The majority of the questions I saw were leads — customers asking if a market had this or that product, or offered a particular service or amenity. Sadly, public answers, often left by Google’s Local Guides, were often flippant and barren of information to help the customer making the query. While Q&A is not believed to have any impact on rankings, ignoring customers is not consistent with goals of providing excellent customer service.

Moreover, ignoring leads has a monetary context. One source estimates that the average American grocery trip bill is $60. This means that the total number of questions in my survey, if answered, could bring in $68,700 for that pool of stores. However, in my household, the average grocery bill is about $150 per trip, which could make answering this many questions in California worth something like $171,750, if the shops have the goods and services the customers are seeking. My numbers are just estimates, but one thing I know is that few brands can afford to leave money on the table.

I would highly recommend that grocery stores make the time to populate Google Q&A with their top FAQs, including whether the business offers delivery, curbside service, and requires mask-wearing. Beyond this, using a product like Moz Local will let you know each time a new question comes in at any of your locations, so that you can be sure no potential customer is being ignored and that all leads are the subject of careful stewardship.

The COVID-19 adaptations top-ranked grocery stores have made

Beyond analyzing the GMB listing elements in my data set, I phoned each of the grocery stores to ask them a few questions to understand how they have adapted fulfillment and policies in response to the pandemic.

I could have relied on the Google attributes depicting curbside and delivery service, but I’m glad I made the calls, because I found discrepancies in use of these attributes and actual services provided. In some cases, stores with these amenities had not been tagged with these attributes yet, and in others, the attributes that were displayed were wrong.

These are my findings:

Home grocery delivery

62% of the stores in my survey set are now offering home grocery delivery. I was surprised that this number wasn’t higher, given consumer demand for the safest ways to keep their households supplied, coupled with the clear need to keep grocery workers as safe as possible.

Of this number, only 12% of grocery stores I spoke with have managed to create an in-house delivery service. 31 of the 50 brands in my data set were having to go with the costly option of third-party last-mile fulfillment. Of this number, 29% are using Instacart, 26% are using Doordash, 8% are using Amazon Prime, 4% are using Peapod and Shipt, and 2% are using Grubhub. Three brands were partnering with more than one third-party service, and two were offering both third-party and in-house delivery options.

Finally, I saw multiple instances of Google allowing third-party fulfillment companies to advertise on the Google Business Profiles of grocery stores. Grocery store staff who told me they had no delivery service are almost certainly unaware of this practice. I find this scenario to be one of the least-acceptable in Google’s local playbook, particularly because they place the burden on business owners to try to get such advertising removed from their listings.

A business working hard to develop an in-house delivery team doesn’t deserve to have Doordash or Instacart or Grubhub parked on their listing, eating away at profits. Be sure you’re checking the Google Business Profiles of any grocery stores you’re marketing and seeking removal of any third-party links you don’t want.

Google Trends recorded the massive spike in searches related to grocery delivery that occurred in spring of 2020 as Americans sought strategies for keeping their households supplied while staying safely at home. When you couple this with the tragic reporting UFCW has been offering on the COVID-19 mortality of grocery workers, increasing delivery options is essential.

Keeping the majority of the public at home and limiting face-to-face contact for grocery store staff has made home delivery a vital COVID-19 adaptation that must expand beyond the 62% adoption rate I saw in my study.

Curbside service

For brands that are still struggling to develop a workable delivery program, curbside pickup has been a welcome option. 64% of the stores in my study are offering curbside service now — a number just slightly higher than the home delivery figure. I saw that in multiple cases, brands that weren’t yet set up to do delivery were at least able to create this fulfillment alternative, but we’d need to see this figure at 100% to ensure no one has to walk into a grocery store and risk infection.

Mask policy

When I asked grocery store staff if their location required all employees and shoppers to wear masks, 83% said yes and 17% said no. This was the most important question in my survey, given the state of the pandemic in the United States, and I want to share what I learned beyond the numbers.

  • In the cities/states where grocery store workers reported no masking requirements, they invariably told me they “lacked the authority to enforce mask-wearing”. Lack of government policy has left the people in these communities helpless to protect themselves.
  • Reviews sometimes told a different story for the 83% of grocery stores where employees told me masks are required. Despite a stated mask-requirement policy, reviewers report instances of encountering unmasked staff and patrons at some locations and express distress over this, sometimes stating they won’t return to these venues. This means that the actual enforcement of PPE-wearing is actually less than 83%.
  • On a purely human level, I sensed that my question about masking made some employees anxious, as if they feared a negative response from me when they told me that masks were required. I can only imagine the experiences some of these staff members have had trying to cope with customers refusing to protect themselves and others from contagion. The exchanges I had with staff further cemented my understanding of the need for clear, national policy to reduce and, hopefully, eliminate COVID-19 so that everyone in our local communities is safeguarded.

My friend and colleague Mike Blumenthal has done the best job in the local SEO industry documenting consumer demand for masking as evinced in reviews, and also, how to get political rant reviews from anti-maskers removed from your GMB listings, should the store you’re marketing receive them. Out of my deep concern for grocery store workers and communities, it’s my strong hope that national leadership will result in 100% participation in grocery industry masking requirements in 2021.

Full contactless fulfillment

0% of the grocery store brands in my study have switched to contactless-only fulfillment, but this methodology may become essential in overcoming the public health emergency. When grocery stores can operate as warehouses where food is stored for curbside pickup and delivery, instead of any in-store shopping, workers and customers can substantially reduce contact.

When the COVID-19 pandemic first emerged in America, markets like Oneota Community Food Coop in Decorah, Iowa switched to pick-up-only for a time, and may need to do so again. Meanwhile, my neighbor is receiving her complete grocery delivery every week from Imperfect Foods, which launched in San Francisco in 2015 and has experienced phenomenal expansion in the past few years on its mission to deliver economical foods in a convenient manner. This comes on the heels of the meal kit delivery bubble, encompassing Blue Apron, HelloFresh, Purple Carrot, and many other options. Even convenience stores like 7-11 are making a strong effort to go contactless.

In April of 2020, 40 million Americans placed online grocery orders. Rapid adaptation is absolutely possible, and until COVID-19 can be placed in the country’s rearview mirror, a national effort may be essential to recast grocery brands as curators of food delivery rather than places to shop in person. Local search marketers should fully participate in grocery store client ideation on how to shape public perception that supports safety for all.

Satisfaction, reputation, and rankings

Delivery, curbside service, and strict masking policies may not seem to have a direct connection to local search rankings, but in the larger scheme of things, they do. Customers reward businesses they love with positive reviews. When a customer is extremely satisfied with how a business like a grocery store takes care of them, studies show this motivates them to award reviews as a thank-you.

The more you demonstrate to customers and communities that the grocery store you’re marketing cares for them, the more you’ll grow your corpus of positive reviews with high star ratings. This, then, will support the local pack ranking goals you’re hoping to meet for maximum online visibility. And your reputation will have become the sort that generates high conversions. 79% of shoppers say contactless pickup is very important to them — whatever you can do to deliver satisfaction to the consumer majority is a very smart move.

What I’ve learned about agility from grocers and their marketers

“There shouldn’t be a brand between you and your customer. You shouldn’t be introducing them to somebody else and nobody should own your information.” — Brian Moyer, CEO, Freshop

It’s not overstating the case to say that the grocery industry is undergoing a revolution. Annual online grocery sales in the US increased from $1.2 billion in August of 2019 to $7.2 billion in June of 2020.

As a local SEO, I can’t think of another industry I can learn more from about adaptation, ingenuity, and resilience. I’ve been following food industry news, and was especially engaged by a webinar I tuned into hosted by digital grocery software provider, Freshop. I’ll summarize seven key takeaways here:

1) If you can develop an in-house delivery program, do it, because it’s the only way to maintain ownership of the full customer experience with your brand. It also makes financial sense in the long run, as I covered previously here in my column on Third Party vs. In-house delivery: A Guide to Informed Choice. In the Freshop webinar, Brian Moyer reminded attendees that Blockbuster once had the opportunity to buy Netflix, but passed on the chance. Now is the time for grocery stores to protect themselves from giving their trade away to the Instacarts and Doordashes on the scene.

2) Whatever software you use to digitize your grocery inventory, it should be strong on POS integration, inventory management, and analytics. I was impressed with the short demo I saw of Freshop’s analytics dashboard coverage of pick times and slot fulfillment for delivery management, profitability across time, tracking of both non-transactional and transactional behaviors, and integration of Google Analytics for measuring conversion rates.

3) Take a page from meal kit services and offer them yourself. Create breakfast kits, supper kits, dessert kits, holiday meal kits, etc. Make it easy for customers to think in terms of meals and get everything they need in a couple of clicks.

4) Consider leveraging digital ads on your grocery store website from brands you already carry. This can create an additional revenue stream.

5) Create online shoppable circulars. Remember that I saw “deals” and “sales” showing up as GMB place topics? Many customers who used to take cues from print circulars can learn to transfer this habit to clickable digital circulars.

6) Carefully evaluate the community support options of the digital shopping software you choose. Most grocery stores aren’t direct competitors and can help one another out. A great example I saw was how one grocer shared the letter he wrote to apply for taking SNAP payments. He was happy to let other grocers copy this form letter to use for their own applications.

7) Celebrate the fact that online commerce has removed historic barriers to customers locating store inventory in a complex floor plan. With a search box, any customer can find any product in any aisle. As difficult as things are right now, this is one silver lining of genuine value to grocers and their marketers.

Summing up

The dominant characteristics of Google’s top ranked grocery stores in the 50 US capitals are:

  • Being located in the city specified in the search
  • Accomplishing GMB landing page PA in the 40 range
  • Not relying on spamming GMB business titles
  • Using “grocery store” as their primary category
  • Winning a 4+ star rating
  • Being heavily reviewed and having received a review in the last week
  • Receiving leads in the form of Q&A
  • Offering delivery and curbside shopping options
  • Requiring masks

The key areas of GMB opportunity that are not yet being utilized by this group to protect dominant visibility are:

  • Customer service in the form of review responses
  • Lead management in the form of answers to Q&A
  • PR in the form of Google Posts

The grocery industry is undergoing a period of significant challenge and opportunity encompassing:

  • The challenge of digitizing inventory
  • The challenge of managing the full consumer experience with delivery and curbside service to avoid being cut out by third parties and to greatly increase safety
  • The opportunity of selling to customers in new ways by fulfilling new needs
  • The opportunity of building permanent loyalty by creating memorable experiences of care and satisfaction during the pandemic that will inform post-pandemic relationships

I want to close with a thank-you note to my favorite, great-hearted neighborhood grocer — a family-owned country store in a rural area. You found me ice during a power shutoff in the midst of a fire, you found me bath tissue during the shortage, and locally-distilled hand sanitizer to keep my family safe. You set up curbside pickup to protect me, and when my car was out of service, your family offered to bring groceries to my home, even though you don’t yet have the staff for a full delivery service.

My grateful loyalty is yours.

As a local search marketer, I may look at data, I may share numbers, but really what I’m thinking about is people. People feeding the nation, deserved of every protection and safeguard ingenuity can devise to get us through these hard times together. If you’re running or marketing a grocery store and have local SEO questions, please ask them in the comments and I’ll do my best to provide helpful answers to support your success. Thank you for all that you’re doing!

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Posted by MiriamEllis
Grocery stores belong at the center of the 2021 local SEO industry conversation.
Other than medical facilities, no enterprise stands out more clearly on the map as essential to daily life in the US, and few verticals have had to adapt more rapidly in mid-flight than our neighborhood food stores in the COVID-19 era. From independent grocers to major supermarket chains, there are heroes in every aisle keeping the nation fed. Any data that supports the strong continuance of these businesses is well worth sharing.
In this article, I’ll provide results from 900 data points I pulled while analyzing the top local-pack-ranked grocery store in each of the 50 US capital cities. I’ll also summarize the practical tactics I’ve learned from listening to grocers and their marketers, highlighting how they’re adapting and succeeding in unprecedented times.
It’s my hope that both in-house and agency grocery marketers will discover important takeaways in my analysis to ensure a successful 2021 for each vital store.
Methodology
I manually queried Google for “grocery store”, modified with the city name of each of the 50 US capital cities. I was not physically located in any of the cities where I searched, which should exclude the influence of user-to-business proximity. In a spreadsheet, I manually recorded 18 characteristics for each of the winning grocery stores, and then drew my statistics from this data.
The GMB characteristics of top-ranked grocery stores
Review these statististics to assess how a grocery store you’re marketing measures up.
Location within city limits

100% of the grocery stores ranking #1 had a physical location within the city limits of the specified search phrase city. No shop, however strong, was getting the number one spot in the local pack if it wasn’t within the city.
Takeaway: Having a location within city limits correlates with a good chance of ranking for searches that contain that city’s name.
Keywords in business title

Only 6% of the top-ranked businesses had business titles that matched any part of my search phrases. This was good to see, given Google’s known (and unfortunate) rewarding of brands that stuff keywords into their business titles in violation of Google’s guidelines. I saw only one business that had extraneous keywords in its title.
Takeaway: You don’t need to spam Google with keywords in your business title to rank as a top grocery store.
Brand diversity

No one brand is winning the top spot across the country. Results were extremely diverse, and made up of a vibrant mix of independent grocers and large chains. Some brands were winning out in more than one state, however. Safeway won five local packs, Whole Foods won four, and Hy-Vee and Hannaford each won three. Beyond this, brands were very varied.
Takeaway: Any brand, large or small, can compete for premium local visibility. No one brand has a monopoly on rankings.
Page Authority of GMB landing page
Page Authority (PA) is a 100-point score developed by Moz that predicts how well a specific website page will rank within search engine results. PA is believed to exert a strong influence on local pack rankings.
Examining the PA of the website landing page linked to from each grocery store’s Google My Business listing, I found that the average PA was 40. The highest PA was 58 and the lowest was 26. Five of the top-ranked supermarkets had no website link at all, amazingly, and this must be a source of mystery and frustration for lower-ranked grocery stores in these cities with GMB listings that do link to their websites.
Takeaway: An average PA of 40 is not prohibitively high. Using Moz Pro to measure competitive PA and actively seeking relevant local links for each location of a grocery brand can help you beat out sleepier competitors. When low PA or even a missing website link are still being rewarded with a high ranking for a competitor of the brand you’re marketing, it’s time to conduct a local business audit to discover which other local search ranking factors might be at play.
Primary GMB category

82% of top-ranked grocery stores use “grocery store” as their primary category. The remainder of brands had chosen a few other categories, like “supermarket” or “organic food store”. The primary category chosen for the GMB listing is believed to have the most impact on which terms the business ranks for in Google’s local packs.
Takeaway: “Grocery store” has a much higher estimated monthly search volume than any other keyword phrase I investigated, such as “supermarket” or “food store”. Grocers wishing to rank for this top term are best off choosing “grocery store” as their primary GMB category.
Rating
The average rating of top-ranked grocery stores is 4.2 stars. The highest rated market had 4.7 stars, and the lowest had 3.6. Star ratings are believed to influence local rank.
Takeaway: No top-ranked grocery store had a perfect 5-star rating. Don’t be overly concerned about the occasional negative review, but do aim for customer satisfaction that yields ratings in the 4-star range, cumulatively.
Review count
Grocery stores receive a massive number of reviews, and review counts are believed to influence rank. Overall, the 50 grocery stores I analyzed had received a total of 62,415 reviews, indicating just how common usage of Google as a dominant consumer review platform has become.
The average review count per store location is 1,248. The count for the most-reviewed grocery store in my data set is 3,632. The fewest reviews a top-ranked store received is 227. Bear in mind that the reviews each store location needs to achieve maximum visibility will be predicated on their unique geographic market and level of competition.
Takeaway: The fact that the overwhelming majority of reviews I saw are unmanaged (have no brand responses) leads me to believe that professional review acquisition campaigns aren’t likely the force driving the high number of total reviews in the grocery industry. Rather, I’d suggest that Americans are self-motivated to review the places they shop for food. Nevertheless, if a brand you’re marketing is being outranked by a competitor with more consumer sentiment, launching a formal review acquisition program is a smart bet for impacting rank and improving customer service for a store location.
Review recency

The recency of your reviews signals to Google and consumers whether your business is a place of bustling activity or a bit on the quiet side. It’s long been theorized that review recency might have some impact on rank as a user behavior signal. In my data set, 52% of top-ranked stores had been reviewed within the last day. 46% had received a review within the last week. Only 2% had seen more than a week go by without receiving a new review.
Takeaway: Multiple consumer surveys have found that customers tend to be most interested in your most recent reviews when making a decision about where to shop. If a grocery store location you’re marketing hasn’t been reviewed in weeks or months (or years!), it’s definitely a signal to begin actively asking customers for feedback.
Always remember that your customers are your grocery store’s best sales force. They freely convince one another to shop with your company by dint of what they say about your brand in reviews. A steady stream of recent, positive sentiment is priceless sales copy for your market.
Owner responses to reviews in 2020

Making use of Google’s owner response function on the reviews a grocery store receives is absolutely basic to providing good customer service. However, in my data set, 60% of top-ranked grocery stores had not responded to a single review in 2020, and of the 40% that had responded to some reviews, not one brand had responded to all of their reviews.
Takeaway: While ignoring reviews appears to have had no negative impact on grocery stores’ ability to achieve top local pack rankings, I can’t emphasize enough what a waste of opportunity is happening in this vertical.
Every review is a customer starting a conversation with a brand, whether their goal is to thank the business or to complain in hopes of receiving help. Ignoring the majority of conversations customers are starting must be extremely deleterious to consumer satisfaction and reputation. 2020 was a year like no other, and grocers have had their hands full adapting and surviving, but going forward, supermarkets that allocate resources to responding to every review will have an incredible customer experience edge over less-engaged competitors.
Place topics

Google excerpts common topics from the body of each store’s reviews and puts them at the top of the review display. 40% of top-ranked grocery stores have “produce” as their most-mentioned place topic, and it was also present for many, many other stores even if it wasn’t their #1 topic. 6% have “organic” and another 6% have “to go” as the most-talked about element, but beyond this, place topics are greatly varied. This area of Google’s interface is sprinkled with terms like “clean”, “cashier”, “deals”, “sales”, and many other words.
Takeaway: I’m not yet convinced of the usefulness or ultimate staying power of this aspect of Google’s review displays. However, it provides very shorthand sentiment analysis for grocers and marketers wanting an at-a-glance idea of what customers are saying in reviews for a brand and its competitors. You need to drill down into the text of the reviews, though, to see whether frequent mentions of something like “clean” are from customers saying a business is or isn’t clean. Place topics just aren’t terribly sophisticated sentiment analysis, at this point.
My data set reveals that Americans are putting premium focus on produce, so one takeaway here is that the quality of your produce department drives consumers to leave reviews. A great produce department could lead to a great rating and great consumer-created content about your market. A disappointing produce section could create the reverse. I also found the prevalence of “organic” place topics revealing, given stats I had seen on the 10X growth in purchases of organic produce between January and March of 2020. There is a clear demand trend here for healthy food that should be informing inventory.
Price attributes
Google places a 1-4 point “$” attribute on many listings as an evaluation of costliness. It’s believed these designations stem, in part, from attribute questions Google asks users, but the overall data set is incomplete. In my sampling, Google only had a price attribute for 42% of the top-ranked grocery stores. Of that number, 76% were marked with the moderate “$$” price attribute.
Takeaway: As I found in my previous piece on The Google Characteristics of America’s Top-Ranked Eateries, neither Google nor consumers tend to consider either the cheapest or most expensive food options to be the most relevant. Concepts of thrift and spendiness differ greatly across the US, but it’s good to know that a modest price evaluation tends to correlate with top local rankings. That seems to be in-step with the current economic picture. The grocery brands you’re marketing don’t need to be the cheapest or the most expensive; the ideal would be delivering good value for a reasonable price.
Google Posts usage before and during COVID-19
Google Posts are a form of microblogging that enables brands to post fresh content to their Google Business Profiles. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, 24% of grocers were publishing Google Posts, but in 2020, only 16% were actively making any use of this feature.
Takeaway: Google offered special COVID-19 post capabilities to businesses in 2020, but top-ranked grocery stores largely ignored this opportunity. Pre-pandemic usage was very meager, with only about a quarter of grocers using Google Posts to boost engagement. The 8% falloff in 2020 may paint a picture of a vertical too preoccupied with other, more urgent priorities to give this feature a try.
Use of Google posts is not believed to impact ranking, and neglect of this feature clearly didn’t hold any of the subjects back from achieving top rankings, but if a brand you’re marketing can allocate resources to this type of publishing, it’s worth trying. Moz Local can help you publish Google Posts to your listings, and increase the opportunities for consumers to engage with your profiles.
Google Questions & Answers

Google Q&A is a Google Business Profile function that lets a company publish and answer its FAQs, as well as letting the public ask and answer questions. Cumulatively, the fifty grocery stores in my survey have received 1,145 questions. The highest number of questions for a single location is 192, and the lowest is two.
Just 14% of grocers have responded to any of the questions their stores have received, and in no case had a grocery store responded to all of its questions.
Takeaway: The majority of the questions I saw were leads — customers asking if a market had this or that product, or offered a particular service or amenity. Sadly, public answers, often left by Google’s Local Guides, were often flippant and barren of information to help the customer making the query. While Q&A is not believed to have any impact on rankings, ignoring customers is not consistent with goals of providing excellent customer service.
Moreover, ignoring leads has a monetary context. One source estimates that the average American grocery trip bill is $60. This means that the total number of questions in my survey, if answered, could bring in $68,700 for that pool of stores. However, in my household, the average grocery bill is about $150 per trip, which could make answering this many questions in California worth something like $171,750, if the shops have the goods and services the customers are seeking. My numbers are just estimates, but one thing I know is that few brands can afford to leave money on the table.
I would highly recommend that grocery stores make the time to populate Google Q&A with their top FAQs, including whether the business offers delivery, curbside service, and requires mask-wearing. Beyond this, using a product like Moz Local will let you know each time a new question comes in at any of your locations, so that you can be sure no potential customer is being ignored and that all leads are the subject of careful stewardship.
The COVID-19 adaptations top-ranked grocery stores have made
Beyond analyzing the GMB listing elements in my data set, I phoned each of the grocery stores to ask them a few questions to understand how they have adapted fulfillment and policies in response to the pandemic.
I could have relied on the Google attributes depicting curbside and delivery service, but I’m glad I made the calls, because I found discrepancies in use of these attributes and actual services provided. In some cases, stores with these amenities had not been tagged with these attributes yet, and in others, the attributes that were displayed were wrong.
These are my findings:
Home grocery delivery

62% of the stores in my survey set are now offering home grocery delivery. I was surprised that this number wasn’t higher, given consumer demand for the safest ways to keep their households supplied, coupled with the clear need to keep grocery workers as safe as possible.
Of this number, only 12% of grocery stores I spoke with have managed to create an in-house delivery service. 31 of the 50 brands in my data set were having to go with the costly option of third-party last-mile fulfillment. Of this number, 29% are using Instacart, 26% are using Doordash, 8% are using Amazon Prime, 4% are using Peapod and Shipt, and 2% are using Grubhub. Three brands were partnering with more than one third-party service, and two were offering both third-party and in-house delivery options.
Finally, I saw multiple instances of Google allowing third-party fulfillment companies to advertise on the Google Business Profiles of grocery stores. Grocery store staff who told me they had no delivery service are almost certainly unaware of this practice. I find this scenario to be one of the least-acceptable in Google’s local playbook, particularly because they place the burden on business owners to try to get such advertising removed from their listings.
A business working hard to develop an in-house delivery team doesn’t deserve to have Doordash or Instacart or Grubhub parked on their listing, eating away at profits. Be sure you’re checking the Google Business Profiles of any grocery stores you’re marketing and seeking removal of any third-party links you don’t want.
Google Trends recorded the massive spike in searches related to grocery delivery that occurred in spring of 2020 as Americans sought strategies for keeping their households supplied while staying safely at home. When you couple this with the tragic reporting UFCW has been offering on the COVID-19 mortality of grocery workers, increasing delivery options is essential.
Keeping the majority of the public at home and limiting face-to-face contact for grocery store staff has made home delivery a vital COVID-19 adaptation that must expand beyond the 62% adoption rate I saw in my study.
Curbside service

For brands that are still struggling to develop a workable delivery program, curbside pickup has been a welcome option. 64% of the stores in my study are offering curbside service now — a number just slightly higher than the home delivery figure. I saw that in multiple cases, brands that weren’t yet set up to do delivery were at least able to create this fulfillment alternative, but we’d need to see this figure at 100% to ensure no one has to walk into a grocery store and risk infection.
Mask policy

When I asked grocery store staff if their location required all employees and shoppers to wear masks, 83% said yes and 17% said no. This was the most important question in my survey, given the state of the pandemic in the United States, and I want to share what I learned beyond the numbers.
In the cities/states where grocery store workers reported no masking requirements, they invariably told me they “lacked the authority to enforce mask-wearing”. Lack of government policy has left the people in these communities helpless to protect themselves. Reviews sometimes told a different story for the 83% of grocery stores where employees told me masks are required. Despite a stated mask-requirement policy, reviewers report instances of encountering unmasked staff and patrons at some locations and express distress over this, sometimes stating they won’t return to these venues. This means that the actual enforcement of PPE-wearing is actually less than 83%.On a purely human level, I sensed that my question about masking made some employees anxious, as if they feared a negative response from me when they told me that masks were required. I can only imagine the experiences some of these staff members have had trying to cope with customers refusing to protect themselves and others from contagion. The exchanges I had with staff further cemented my understanding of the need for clear, national policy to reduce and, hopefully, eliminate COVID-19 so that everyone in our local communities is safeguarded.
My friend and colleague Mike Blumenthal has done the best job in the local SEO industry documenting consumer demand for masking as evinced in reviews, and also, how to get political rant reviews from anti-maskers removed from your GMB listings, should the store you’re marketing receive them. Out of my deep concern for grocery store workers and communities, it’s my strong hope that national leadership will result in 100% participation in grocery industry masking requirements in 2021.
Full contactless fulfillment
0% of the grocery store brands in my study have switched to contactless-only fulfillment, but this methodology may become essential in overcoming the public health emergency. When grocery stores can operate as warehouses where food is stored for curbside pickup and delivery, instead of any in-store shopping, workers and customers can substantially reduce contact.
When the COVID-19 pandemic first emerged in America, markets like Oneota Community Food Coop in Decorah, Iowa switched to pick-up-only for a time, and may need to do so again. Meanwhile, my neighbor is receiving her complete grocery delivery every week from Imperfect Foods, which launched in San Francisco in 2015 and has experienced phenomenal expansion in the past few years on its mission to deliver economical foods in a convenient manner. This comes on the heels of the meal kit delivery bubble, encompassing Blue Apron, HelloFresh, Purple Carrot, and many other options. Even convenience stores like 7-11 are making a strong effort to go contactless.
In April of 2020, 40 million Americans placed online grocery orders. Rapid adaptation is absolutely possible, and until COVID-19 can be placed in the country’s rearview mirror, a national effort may be essential to recast grocery brands as curators of food delivery rather than places to shop in person. Local search marketers should fully participate in grocery store client ideation on how to shape public perception that supports safety for all.
Satisfaction, reputation, and rankings
Delivery, curbside service, and strict masking policies may not seem to have a direct connection to local search rankings, but in the larger scheme of things, they do. Customers reward businesses they love with positive reviews. When a customer is extremely satisfied with how a business like a grocery store takes care of them, studies show this motivates them to award reviews as a thank-you.
The more you demonstrate to customers and communities that the grocery store you’re marketing cares for them, the more you’ll grow your corpus of positive reviews with high star ratings. This, then, will support the local pack ranking goals you’re hoping to meet for maximum online visibility. And your reputation will have become the sort that generates high conversions. 79% of shoppers say contactless pickup is very important to them — whatever you can do to deliver satisfaction to the consumer majority is a very smart move.
What I’ve learned about agility from grocers and their marketers
“There shouldn’t be a brand between you and your customer. You shouldn’t be introducing them to somebody else and nobody should own your information.” — Brian Moyer, CEO, Freshop
It’s not overstating the case to say that the grocery industry is undergoing a revolution. Annual online grocery sales in the US increased from $1.2 billion in August of 2019 to $7.2 billion in June of 2020.
As a local SEO, I can’t think of another industry I can learn more from about adaptation, ingenuity, and resilience. I’ve been following food industry news, and was especially engaged by a webinar I tuned into hosted by digital grocery software provider, Freshop. I’ll summarize seven key takeaways here:
1) If you can develop an in-house delivery program, do it, because it’s the only way to maintain ownership of the full customer experience with your brand. It also makes financial sense in the long run, as I covered previously here in my column on Third Party vs. In-house delivery: A Guide to Informed Choice. In the Freshop webinar, Brian Moyer reminded attendees that Blockbuster once had the opportunity to buy Netflix, but passed on the chance. Now is the time for grocery stores to protect themselves from giving their trade away to the Instacarts and Doordashes on the scene.
2) Whatever software you use to digitize your grocery inventory, it should be strong on POS integration, inventory management, and analytics. I was impressed with the short demo I saw of Freshop’s analytics dashboard coverage of pick times and slot fulfillment for delivery management, profitability across time, tracking of both non-transactional and transactional behaviors, and integration of Google Analytics for measuring conversion rates.
3) Take a page from meal kit services and offer them yourself. Create breakfast kits, supper kits, dessert kits, holiday meal kits, etc. Make it easy for customers to think in terms of meals and get everything they need in a couple of clicks.
4) Consider leveraging digital ads on your grocery store website from brands you already carry. This can create an additional revenue stream.
5) Create online shoppable circulars. Remember that I saw “deals” and “sales” showing up as GMB place topics? Many customers who used to take cues from print circulars can learn to transfer this habit to clickable digital circulars.
6) Carefully evaluate the community support options of the digital shopping software you choose. Most grocery stores aren’t direct competitors and can help one another out. A great example I saw was how one grocer shared the letter he wrote to apply for taking SNAP payments. He was happy to let other grocers copy this form letter to use for their own applications.
7) Celebrate the fact that online commerce has removed historic barriers to customers locating store inventory in a complex floor plan. With a search box, any customer can find any product in any aisle. As difficult as things are right now, this is one silver lining of genuine value to grocers and their marketers.
Summing up

The dominant characteristics of Google’s top ranked grocery stores in the 50 US capitals are:
Being located in the city specified in the searchAccomplishing GMB landing page PA in the 40 rangeNot relying on spamming GMB business titlesUsing “grocery store” as their primary categoryWinning a 4+ star ratingBeing heavily reviewed and having received a review in the last weekReceiving leads in the form of Q&AOffering delivery and curbside shopping optionsRequiring masks
The key areas of GMB opportunity that are not yet being utilized by this group to protect dominant visibility are:
Customer service in the form of review responsesLead management in the form of answers to Q&APR in the form of Google Posts
The grocery industry is undergoing a period of significant challenge and opportunity encompassing:
The challenge of digitizing inventoryThe challenge of managing the full consumer experience with delivery and curbside service to avoid being cut out by third parties and to greatly increase safetyThe opportunity of selling to customers in new ways by fulfilling new needsThe opportunity of building permanent loyalty by creating memorable experiences of care and satisfaction during the pandemic that will inform post-pandemic relationships
I want to close with a thank-you note to my favorite, great-hearted neighborhood grocer — a family-owned country store in a rural area. You found me ice during a power shutoff in the midst of a fire, you found me bath tissue during the shortage, and locally-distilled hand sanitizer to keep my family safe. You set up curbside pickup to protect me, and when my car was out of service, your family offered to bring groceries to my home, even though you don’t yet have the staff for a full delivery service.
My grateful loyalty is yours.
As a local search marketer, I may look at data, I may share numbers, but really what I’m thinking about is people. People feeding the nation, deserved of every protection and safeguard ingenuity can devise to get us through these hard times together. If you’re running or marketing a grocery store and have local SEO questions, please ask them in the comments and I’ll do my best to provide helpful answers to support your success. Thank you for all that you’re doing! Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!Read MoreThe Moz Blog

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Subdomain vs. Subdirectory: Which Is Better for SEO?

Subdomain vs. Subdirectory: Which Is Better for SEO?

One of the biggest ‘arguments‘ in SEO is the subdomain vs subdirectory debate, and in this guide, we want to clear up the confusion and help to answer the questions around this. We‘ll dive deep into the SEO considerations that you need to take around each of these and outline the instances when each of these makes the most sense to use.

One of the biggest ‘arguments‘ in SEO is the subdomain vs subdirectory debate, and in this guide, we want to clear up the confusion and help to answer the questions around this. We‘ll dive deep into the SEO considerations that you need to take around each of these and outline the instances when each of these makes the most sense to use.Read MoreSEOSemrush blog

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How to create the right meta description

The meta description is a snippet of up to about 155 characters – a tag in HTML – which summarizes a page’s content. Search engines show it in search results mostly when the searched-for phrase is within the description. So optimizing it is crucial for on-page SEO. In this post, I tell you the characteristics of a good meta description, and how Yoast SEO can help you with it. 

Table of contents

Welcome to our #1 most-read blog post of 2020! We’re sharing this blog post as part of our holiday calendar, which holds a new surprise every day. So make sure to check it out!

Did you get a red bullet for the keyphrase in meta description check in Yoast SEO? Read what this check does, and how to turn this bullet green. Yoast SEO also checks the length of your meta description. Read about how that check works, and how to write a concise meta description.

What is a meta description?

The meta description is an HTML tag, which looks like this in the HTML code for the page:

<meta name="description" content="A page's description, usually one or two sentences."/>

Its purpose is simple: it needs to get someone searching with a search term on Google to click your link. In other words, meta descriptions are there to generate click-throughs from search engines.

Search engines say there is no direct SEO benefit from the meta description – they don’t use it in their ranking algorithm. But there is an indirect benefit: Google uses click-through-rate (CTR) as a way of working out whether you’re a good result. If more people click on your result, Google considers you to be a good result and will – based on your position – move you up the rankings. This is why optimizing your meta description is so important, as is optimizing your titles.

Example of meta description on yoast.com shown in the search results
A meta description from yoast.com as seen in the search results

Adding the date to the snippet preview

People often ask questions about the date shown in the Google preview of our Yoast SEO plugin. We’ve added this because search engines may display a date with your snippet. So it’s important to factor it in when you decide on the right length of your meta description. Unfortunately, there’s no way to directly control whether this date is shown or not, but you can try to manage the dates they use in the search results.

Characteristics of a good meta description

Based on the research I did on this topic, as well as my own experience, I came up with this list of elements you need to write a good meta description: 

1. Keep it up to 155 characters 

The right length doesn’t really exist; it depends on the message you want to convey. You should take enough space to get the message across, but keep it short and snappy at the same time. However, if you check the search results in Google, you’ll mostly see snippets of 120 to 156 characters, like in the example below. 

puppy training example meta description right length

Unfortunately, we can’t fully control what Google displays in the search results. Sometimes it decides to show the meta description, and sometimes it just grabs some sentences of your copy. Either way, your best bet is to keep it short. That way, if Google does decide to show the meta description you’ve written, it won’t be cut short. 

2. Use active voice and make it actionable 

If you consider the meta description the invitation to your page, you have to think about your user and their (possible) motivation to visit your page. Make sure that your description isn’t dull, difficult or too cryptic. People need to know what they can expect to find on your page.

The example in the image below is the kind of description you should strive to write. It’s active, motivating, and addressing you directly. You just know what you’re going to get if you click on the link!

3. Include a call-to-action

“Hello, we have such and such new product, and you want it. Find out more!” This overlaps with what I said about the active voice, but I wanted to emphasize it once again. The meta description is your sales text. Except, in this case, the “product” you are trying to sell is the page that is linked. Invitations like Learn more, Get it now, Try for free come in handy and we use them too.

meta description of the SEO copywriting training page on yoast.com

4. Use your focus keyword

If the search keyword matches a part of the text in the meta description, Google will be more inclined to use it and highlight it in the search results. This will make the link to your site even more inviting. Google sometimes even highlights synonyms. In the example below, both the Academy Awards and Oscars are highlighted. Getting your results emphasized like that makes them stand out even more.

Example of snippet for search term Academy Awards

5. Show specifications, where possible 

If you have a product for the tech-savvy, it can be a good idea to focus on the technical specs. For example, you can include the manufacturer, SKU, price, things like that. If the visitor is specifically looking for that product, chances are you won’t have to convince them. As in the example below. The watch can help me stay fit? Sign me up, that’s all I needed to know. Note that to optimize your result in this manner, you should work on getting rich snippets.

Google result for Apple Watch Series 5

6. Make sure it matches the content of the page

This is an important one. Google will find out if you use the meta descriptions to trick visitors into clicking on your result. They might even penalize you if you do it. But besides that, misleading descriptions will probably also increase your bounce rate. Which will also lower people’s trust in your company. It’s a bad idea for that reason alone. That is why you want the meta description to match the content on the page.

7. Make it unique 

If your meta description is the same as those for other pages, the user experience in Google will be hampered. Although your page titles might vary, all pages will appear to be the same because all the descriptions are the same. Instead of creating duplicate meta descriptions, you’d be better off leaving it blank. Google will pick a snippet from the page containing the keyword used in the query. That being said, writing a unique meta description for every page you want to rank with is always the best practice.

How Yoast SEO helps you write meta descriptions

If you’re on WordPress and using Yoast SEO, adding a meta description is easy as pie. Firstly, you can write it in the Google preview section of Yoast SEO. But, Yoast SEO also gives you feedback on it in the SEO analysis. The plugin checks two things, the meta description length and whether you’ve used your focus keyphrase in it. So let’s see how the plugin helps you, and what you can do with it. 

What does the keyphrase in meta description assessment in Yoast SEO do?

This check is all about using the keyphrase in the meta description. A focus keyphrase is the search term you want a page to rank with. When people use that term, you want them to find your page. You base your keyphrase on keyword research. In a nutshell, after you do your research, you should end up with a combination of words that the majority of your audience is most likely to search for. We’ve already discussed that when you use your keyphrase in the meta description, Google will likely highlight it. That makes it easier for people to see that they’ve found what they are looking for. 

Yoast SEO checks if and how often you use the words from your focus keyphrase in the meta description text. In addition, if you use Yoast SEO Premium, it also takes into account the synonyms you enter. If you overdo it, the plugin advises you to limit the use of your focus keyphrase.

keyphrase in meta description check in Yoast SEO

How to get a green bullet for the keyphrase in meta description

If you don’t mention the keyphrase in the meta description at all, you’ll get a red bullet. So, make sure to write one. But, don’t stuff your meta description with your keyphrase, because that will also get you a red bullet. And, make sure to mention all the words from your keyphrase near to each other. Search engines are pretty smart nowadays, but you still need to make it clear what your page is about. 

Our Yoast SEO Premium plugin lets you enter synonyms and related keyphrases for your keyphrase. Then, it takes the synonym into account when it performs its analysis. If you’ve included your keyphrase and a synonym, that counts as two mentions. Use that! A few highlighted words draw more attention than just the one. 

What does the meta description length assessment do?

This check measures whether your meta description is too short (less than 120 characters) or too long (more than 156 characters).  When your meta description has the right length, you’ll get a green bullet. If it’s too long, or too short, you’ll get an orange bullet in the SEO analysis of Yoast SEO (or red, if you’ve marked your article as cornerstone content).

Meta description length check in Yoast SEO

How to write a concise meta description

A good meta description convinces people that your page offers the best result to their query. But, to be the best result, you must know what people are looking for. What is their search intent? Are they looking for an answer to a question? If they are, try to give them the most complete answer. Are they looking for a product? Write down what makes your product stand out and why they would best buy it in your store. Be concise and convincing!

You get real-time feedback on the meta description length in the Google preview section in the Yoast SEO sidebar or meta box. If you want to write a meta description, click on “Google preview” in the Yoast SEO sidebar. This will open the snippet editor and you’ll see input fields to edit the SEO title, the slug and the meta description. When you start typing in the meta description input field, the snippet preview at the top of the Google preview editor will immediately show your new text. Underneath the input field, there is a bar. It’s orange when you start typing and will become green when you’ve added enough information. When you add too much text, it will turn orange again.

Google preview editor in Yoast SEO
Google preview editor in the Yoast SEO sidebar

It’s also possible to write or edit your meta description in the Yoast SEO meta box underneath your post editor. Just go the SEO tab in the meta box (if it’s not on this tab by default) and you can start typing in the field under Meta description right away.

What to do if you need meta descriptions for a lot of pages?

Does it feel like you need to change all your meta descriptions after reading this? But not sure how to fit that in your schedule? Google has the answer:

If you don’t have time to create a description for every single page, try to prioritize your content: At the very least, create a description for the critical URLs like your home page and popular pages.

You can check which of your pages rank highest with Google Search Console. Simply take it from there. Additionally, it’s also possible to optimize your meta descriptions with variables in Yoast SEO. Allowing you to speed up this process a lot without having to worry about duplicate descriptions.

Meta descriptions for social sharing

Do you have Yoast SEO? In that case: check the Facebook and Twitter preview in the Yoast SEO sidebar or social tab in the Yoast SEO meta box below your post or page. You can add a separate description for your social media channels there. In Yoast SEO Premium, you even have social previews that show you what your post or page will look like when shared on social media.

Read more: How to use the Google preview in Yoast SEO »

The post How to create the right meta description appeared first on Yoast.

The meta description is a snippet of up to about 155 characters – a tag in HTML – which summarizes a page’s content. Search engines show it in search results mostly when the searched-for phrase is within the description. So optimizing it is crucial for on-page SEO. In this post, I tell you the characteristics
The post How to create the right meta description appeared first on Yoast.Read MoreContent SEO, SEO Copywriting

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Key Semrush Product Updates in 2020

Key Semrush Product Updates in 2020

We have gathered Semrush biggest 2020 product updates – from SEO, Content Marketing, and Competitive Research tools to special solutions for Amazon sellers’ success and news on the latest integrations. Meet the newest features introduced this year, and make sure you are making the most out of our toolkit.

We have gathered Semrush biggest 2020 product updates – from SEO, Content Marketing, and Competitive Research tools to special solutions for Amazon sellers’ success and news on the latest integrations. Meet the newest features introduced this year, and make sure you are making the most out of our toolkit.Read MoreDiscover SEMrushSemrush blog