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SEO A/B Split Testing 101

 SEO A/B Split Testing 101

Experimentation is at the heart of digital marketing. Whether testing different ad formats or performing CRO with landing page designs, A/B tests allow you to validate large-scale changes and enhance your conversion funnel.

Experimentation is at the heart of digital marketing. Whether testing different ad formats or performing CRO with landing page designs, A/B tests allow you to validate large-scale changes and enhance your conversion funnel.Read MoreSEOSemrush blog

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JavaScript SEO: An In-Depth Guide

JavaScript SEO: An In-Depth Guide

One of the commonly talked about challenges amongst the SEO community is getting Google to index JavaScript content, and in this guide, we‘re going to teach you everything you need to know about JavaScript SEO, looking at common problems and solutions and helping you to understand how search engines crawl, render and index content that‘s generated in this way.

One of the commonly talked about challenges amongst the SEO community is getting Google to index JavaScript content, and in this guide, we‘re going to teach you everything you need to know about JavaScript SEO, looking at common problems and solutions and helping you to understand how search engines crawl, render and index content that‘s generated in this way.Read MoreSEOSemrush blog

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What’s technical SEO? 8 technical aspects everyone should know

An SEO Basics post about technical SEO might seem like a contradiction in terms. Nevertheless, some basic knowledge about the more technical side of SEO can mean the difference between a high ranking site and a site that doesn’t rank at all. Technical SEO isn’t easy, but here we’ll explain – in layman’s language – which aspects you should (ask your developer to) pay attention to when working on the technical foundation of your website.

What is technical SEO?

Technical SEO refers to improving the technical aspects of a website in order to increase the ranking of its pages in the search engines. Making a website faster, easier to crawl and understandable for search engines are the pillars of technical optimization. Technical SEO is part of on-page SEO, which focuses on improving elements on your website to get higher rankings. It’s the opposite of off-page SEO, which is about generating exposure for a website through other channels.

Why should you optimize your site technically?

Google and other search engines want to present their users with the best possible results for their query. Therefore, Google’s robots crawl and evaluate web pages on a multitude of factors. Some factors are based on the user’s experience, like how fast a page loads. Other factors help search engine robots grasp what your pages are about. This is what, amongst others, structured data does. So, by improving technical aspects you help search engines crawl and understand your site. If you do this well, you might be rewarded with higher rankings or even rich results.

It also works the other way around: if you make serious technical mistakes on your site, they can cost you. You wouldn’t be the first to block search engines entirely from crawling your site by accidentally adding a trailing slash in the wrong place in your robots.txt file.

But it’s a misconception you should focus on the technical details of a website just to please search engines. A website should work well – be fast, clear, and easy to use – for your users in the first place. Fortunately, creating a strong technical foundation often coincides with a better experience for both users and search engines.

What are the characteristics of a technically optimized website?

A technically sound website is fast for users and easy to crawl for search engine robots. A proper technical setup helps search engines to understand what a site is about and it prevents confusion caused by, for instance, duplicate content. Moreover, it doesn’t send visitors, nor search engines, into dead-end streets by non-working links. Here, we’ll shortly go into some important characteristics of a technically optimized website.

1. It’s fast

Nowadays, web pages need to load fast. People are impatient and don’t want to wait for a page to open. In 2016 already, research showed that 53% of mobile website visitors will leave if a webpage doesn’t open within three seconds. So if your website is slow, people get frustrated and move on to another website, and you’ll miss out on all that traffic.

Google knows slow web pages offer a less than optimal experience. Therefore they prefer web pages that load faster. So, a slow web page also ends up further down the search results than its faster equivalent, resulting in even less traffic. And, in 2021, Page experience, referring to how fast people experience a web page to be, will even become a ranking factor. So you better prepare!

Wondering if your website is fast enough? Read how to easily test your site speed. Most tests will also give you pointers on what to improve. You can also take a look at the Core Web vitals as Google uses them to indicate Page experience. And, we’ll guide you through common site speed optimization tips here.

2. It’s crawlable for search engines

Search engines use robots to crawl or spider your website. The robots follow links to discover content on your site. A great internal linking structure will make sure that they’ll understand what the most important content on your site is.

But there are more ways to guide robots. You can, for instance, block them from crawling certain content if you don’t want them to go there. You can also let them crawl a page, but tell them not to show this page in the search results or not to follow the links on that page.

Robots.txt file

You can give robots directions on your site by using the robots.txt file. It’s a powerful tool, which should be handled carefully. As we mentioned in the beginning, a small mistake might prevent robots from crawling (important parts of) your site. Sometimes, people unintentionally block their site’s CSS and JS files in the robot.txt file. These files contain code that tells browsers what your site should look like and how it works. If those files are blocked, search engines can’t find out if your site works properly.

All in all, we recommend to really dive into robots.txt if you want to learn how it works. Or, perhaps even better, let a developer handle it for you!

The meta robots tag

The robots meta tag is a piece of code that you won’t see on the page as a visitor. It’s in the source code in the so-called head section of a page. Robots read this section when finding a page. In it, they’ll find information about what they’ll find on the page or what they need to do with it.

If you want search engine robots to crawl a page, but to keep it out of the search results for some reason, you can tell them with the robots meta tag. With the robots meta tag, you can also instruct them to crawl a page, but not to follow the links on the page. With Yoast SEO it’s easy to noindex or nofollow a post or page. Learn for which pages you’d want to do that.

Read more: https://yoast.com/what-is-crawlability/

3. It doesn’t have (many) dead links

We’ve discussed that slow websites are frustrating. What might be even more annoying for visitors than a slow page, is landing on a page that doesn’t exist at all. If a link leads to a non-existing page on your site, people will encounter a 404 error page. There goes your carefully crafted user experience!

What’s more, search engines don’t like to find these error pages either. And, they tend to find even more dead links than visitors encounter because they follow every link they bump into, even if it’s hidden.

Unfortunately, most sites have (at least) some dead links, because a website is a continuous work in progress: people make things and break things. Fortunately, there are tools that can help you retrieve dead links on your site. Read about those tools and how to solve 404 errors.

To prevent unnecessary dead links, you should always redirect the URL of a page when you delete it or move it. Ideally, you’d redirect it to a page that replaces the old page. With Yoast SEO Premium, you can easily make redirects yourself. No need for a developer!

Read more: https://yoast.com/what-is-a-redirect/

4. It doesn’t confuse search engines with duplicate content

If you have the same content on multiple pages of your site – or even on other sites – search engines might get confused. Because, if these pages show the same content, which one should they rank highest? As a result, they might rank all pages with the same content lower.

Unfortunately, you might have a duplicate content issue without even knowing it. Because of technical reasons, different URLs can show the same content. For a visitor, this doesn’t make any difference, but for a search engine it does; it’ll see the same content on a different URL.

Luckily, there’s a technical solution to this issue. With the so-called, canonical link element you can indicate what the original page – or the page you’d like to rank in the search engines – is. In Yoast SEO you can easily set a canonical URL for a page. And, to make it easy for you, Yoast SEO adds self-referencing canonical links to all your pages. This will help prevent duplicate content issues that you’d might not even be aware of.

5. It’s secure

A technically optimized website is a secure website. Making your website safe for users to guarantee their privacy is a basic requirement nowadays. There are many things you can do to make your (WordPress) website secure, and one of the most crucial things is implementing HTTPS.

HTTPS makes sure that no-one can intercept the data that’s sent over between the browser and the site. So, for instance, if people log in to your site, their credentials are safe. You’ll need a so-called SSL certificate to implement HTTPS on your site. Google acknowledges the importance of security and therefore made HTTPS a ranking signal: secure websites rank higher than unsafe equivalents.

You can easily check if your website is HTTPS in most browsers. On the left hand side of the search bar of your browser, you’ll see a lock if it’s safe. If you see the words “not secure” you (or your developer) have some work to do!

Read more: SEO Basics: What is HTTPS?

6. Plus: it has structured data

Structured data helps search engines understand your website, content or even your business better. With structured data you can tell search engines, what kind of product you sell or which recipes you have on your site. Plus, it will give you the opportunity to provide all kinds of details about those products or recipes.

Because there’s a fixed format (described on Schema.org) in which you should provide this information, search engines can easily find and understand it. It helps them to place your content in a bigger picture. Here, you can read a story about how it works and how Yoast SEO helps you with that. For instance, Yoast SEO creates a Schema graph for your site and has free structured data content blocks for your How-to and FAQ content.

Implementing structured data can bring you more than just a better understanding by search engines. It also makes your content eligible for rich results; those shiny results with stars or details that stand out in the search results.

7. Plus: It has an XML sitemap

Simply put, an XML sitemap is a list of all pages of your site. It serves as a roadmap for search engines on your site. With it, you’ll make sure search engines won’t miss any important content on your site. The XML sitemap is often categorized in posts, pages, tags or other custom post types and includes the number of images and the last modified date for every page.

Ideally, a website doesn’t need an XML sitemap. If it has an internal linking structure which connects all content nicely, robots won’t need it. However, not all sites have a great structure, and having an XML sitemap won’t do any harm. So we’d always advise having an XML site map on your site.

8. Plus: International websites use hreflang

If your site targets more than one country or countries where the same language is spoken, search engines need a little help to understand which countries or language you’re trying to reach. If you help them, they can show people the right website for their area in the search results.

Hreflang tags help you do just that. You can define for a page which country and language it is meant for. This also solves a possible duplicate content problem: even if your US and UK site show the same content, Google will know it’s written for a different region.

Optimizing international websites is quite a specialism. If you’d like to learn how to make your international sites rank, we’d advise taking a look at our Multilingual SEO training.

Want to learn more about this?

So this is technical SEO in a nutshell. It’s quite a lot already, while we’ve only scratched the surface here. There’s so much more to tell about (the technical side of) SEO! Want to learn more? Take a look at our free Structured data for beginners training. Want to learn all? If you get Yoast SEO Premium, you’ll get access to all our training courses and great tools such as our redirect manager!

Read more: https://yoast.com/wordpress-seo/

The post What’s technical SEO? 8 technical aspects everyone should know appeared first on Yoast.

An SEO Basics post about technical SEO might seem like a contradiction in terms. Nevertheless, some basic knowledge about the more technical side of SEO can mean the difference between a high ranking site and a site that doesn’t rank at all. Technical SEO isn’t easy, but here we’ll explain – in layman’s language –
The post What’s technical SEO? 8 technical aspects everyone should know appeared first on Yoast.Read MoreCrawl directives, hreflang, Rich Snippets, SEO Basics, Site Speed, Technical SEO, XML Sitemap

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Recent GTmetrix updates and fixes

A quick changelog of our recent changes and updates to GTmetrix.   Lighthouse updates and fixes We’ve done various updates and adjustments to our Lighthouse implementation that improves error rates and audit results.   Audit Improvements Fixed issue on “Use a CDN” and “Combine images using CSS sprites” audits showing non http/https items Fixed issue […]A quick changelog of our recent changes and updates to GTmetrix.   Lighthouse updates and fixes We’ve done various updates and adjustments to our Lighthouse implementation that improves error rates and audit results.   Audit Improvements Fixed issue on “Use a CDN” and “Combine images using CSS sprites” audits showing non http/https items Fixed issueRead MoreChangesGTmetrix

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An In-Depth Guide to Log File Analysis for SEO

An In-Depth Guide to Log File Analysis for SEO

Your website’s log file records every single request that’s made to your server, and analyzing this information can reveal insights about how search engines are crawling your site and its web pages. And in this guide, we’re going to take a deep dive into how to carry out a log file analysis and what it can be used for in SEO.

Your website’s log file records every single request that’s made to your server, and analyzing this information can reveal insights about how search engines are crawling your site and its web pages. And in this guide, we’re going to take a deep dive into how to carry out a log file analysis and what it can be used for in SEO.Read MoreSEOSemrush blog

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Clean up your site structure: how to reorganize your website

At a certain point, your website can grow to a monstrous collection of pages. You may realize that you have too many items in your menu and that the coherence of your website is nowhere to be found. Time to clean this mess up! But where to start? It’s a tough job, and sometimes it takes a lot of rethinking, rewriting and even creating new pages. That’s why we’ll help you reorganize your website and create a structure that Google and your users will appreciate.

To create a new structure for your website you’ll have to gather some information first. Here, we’ll guide you through this process step by step.

1. What’s your goal?

It’s tempting to just start shuffling the content you already have. But if you do that, you might skip one of the most important steps of reorganizing your site: thinking about the purpose of your website. Most likely, you’ve already done that when you’ve created your website some years ago. Or, when you started your keyword research. But, goals can change over time, as can the topics you write about or the products you sell.

So, first, take a step back and think about the mission of your blog, online store, or business. If you work for a larger organization with multiple stakeholders of the website, make sure you’re all on the same page about this. Of course, you can also agree on various sub-goals of parts of your website. Don’t forget to note these goals down for later reference.

Read all about defining the mission and goals of your website.

2. What content do you have?

Create an overview

Let’s create an overview of the content you have. You can use a simple spreadsheet for that. If you have thousands of pages, you might not want to mention all your pages in this spreadsheet. Most likely, your pages will belong to a certain section or category, for instance, your blog, services, or product pages. Or, if you have an online store you probably have some high-level categories, so you can mention these in your spreadsheet instead of every individual product page. You can place the most high-level sections/categories in the first column and get more specific in the second, third or fourth column. If you don’t have any sections or categories, but you do have lots of pages on your site, make sure to create some kind of hierarchy first!

Gather data

Don’t forget to check your (Google Analytics) data on the performance of these sections/pages/posts too. How much traffic do they get? Where does the traffic come from? Newsletters, Google, or somewhere else? And what is the page value or eCommerce conversion rate? It also makes sense to perform user research, to analyze what people search for/click on on your home page. This will give you loads of information on what your audience is looking for, which is essential if you want to serve them well!

3. Take a closer look at your menu

The structure of your website is, in most cases, presented in the menu of your website. Of course, breadcrumbs and permalinks help as well, but these are not the things most visitors will take into account. The menu is. Your menu ideally consists of a limited number of top-level items, to keep your menu focused. To take a closer look at your menu, you may want to visualize it in the form of a table or document and keep it next to the other documents you’ve made.

4. Do your goal, content, and menu match?

If you’ve followed the steps above, you’ve now got three things: the goal and sub-goals of your website, information about its content and how it performs, and your current menu. Now ask yourself these questions:

  • What’s my most important content according to my mission?
  • Is that the content my audience is looking for too? (What does the data say?)
  • Can my users find it in the menu or on the homepage?
  • If I look at my goals, is there anything essential missing on my site?
  • Do I have content in my menu or high up in the hierarchy that isn’t essential after all, or doesn’t perform well?

Answering these questions will give you ideas on how to reorganize the structure of your site. In your spreadsheet, you can highlight the most important pages, sections, or categories. These should be accessible through your menu and/or homepage. That way, they will be easy to access for visitors and search engines.

You may find pages that are still good but don’t seem suitable for your menu anymore. Take them out of your top-level menu because you don’t want it to become cluttered. Just make sure to link them on related pages, your XML sitemap, and, for instance, in the footer of your site. This way Google and your visitors will still be able to find these pages. Having somewhere between 5 and 8 items (depending on the size of your website or store) in your main, top-level menu enables people to scan and find what they’re looking for at a glance.

When designing your homepage, obviously think about your goals, but also consider the user journey of your audience. Try to figure out where (most) people are in their journey when they land on your homepage and what they expect to find. You don’t want to bombard people with lots of sales-oriented content if they’re not ready for it yet! Content design is a great approach to providing users with the content they need at a certain point in their user journey.

5. Clean up!

If you look at your spreadsheet closely you may also find out that some of your pages should be updated or deleted. Or that complete sections or categories should be moved, merged, or split.

Update or delete?

You’ll probably find pages that need updating or worse: that actually shouldn’t be on your website or simply don’t fit the current or new site structure. For example, services you used to offer or information that just isn’t accurate anymore. Not sure what to do? Learn when to update or delete a post on your website.

Make a list of your pages or posts that need updating. If you have many pages that need an update and multiple people working on them, Trello is a great system to keep track of the process of updating your content.

If a page shouldn’t be on your site anymore, delete it from your website. Redirect that page to a page that is closely related to it. Preferably you should redirect the URL to a related article, to preserve any traffic that this page had. If that related article doesn’t exist, redirect to a related category page, or as a last resort to your homepage. If you want to let people and Google know it’s been deleted on purpose, serve a 410 Content Deleted error. Here you’ll find everything you need to know about properly deleting pages from your site.

The redirect manager in our Yoast SEO Premium plugin is a great help here because it allows you to create redirects yourself, no need for a developer! It will even ask you what to do with a URL when you’ve deleted a post or page.

redirect deleted post redirects manager
Yoast SEO Premium will ask you what to do with a URL when you’ve deleted a post

Merge and move content

Sometimes it might be necessary to merge content. For instance, if you find out you have a lot of (similar) content on a topic. To prevent keyword cannibalization you can decide to merge multiple articles in one. Here you’ll find a guide on how to fix cannibalization.

If you move or merge categories or complete sections, keep in mind that the URLs of these (and underlying) pages might change. Fortunately, Yoast SEO Premium will automatically create a 301 redirect for you if you move a child page to another parent. That way the new URL will reflect the new location of this child page on your website. But, at some point, you might want to replace these 301s with the actual new URLs to prevent redirect chains.

Do consider: Internal linking, cornerstone content, and taxonomies

When talking about restructuring a website, we cannot skip discussing these two topics: Internal linking and cornerstone content.

Internal linking and cornerstone content

Cornerstone articles are posts or pages that are essential to you and your target audience. The idea is that you’ve got one main, very complete article that is of huge interest to your audience. You probably have other articles about subtopics of this topic, but this main article covers all you need to know. If you’re smart, you’ll also link from these sub-articles to your cornerstone content. You’ll not only guide users to it, but Google will also see this as a sign of importance, and will therefore rank it higher.

If you’re restructuring your website, you might want to grab the opportunity to scrutinize your internal linking structure as well. Are you linking your topically related posts with each other? Do you have a cornerstone strategy and are you linking to your most valuable posts most often? If not, Yoast SEO Premium offers you a helping hand. When writing a post, Yoast SEO Premium will suggest related content on your site to link to, based on the copy of the post you’re currently working on. If you’ve marked your most important posts as cornerstone content, it will even show these at the top of these suggested links. How awesome is that?!

internal linking suggestions in Yoast SEO sidebar
With Yoast SEO Premium you’ll find internal linking suggestions in your sidebar

Rethink your taxonomies

When using WordPress, an apparent site structure is provided by the categories and tags you have used to divide your posts and perhaps pages. In WordPress, these are called ‘taxonomies’. In general, 8 to 10 categories would suffice for a website. Perhaps an online store could have more, but the top-level should preferably consist of that number of categories to keep your site and site structure focused.

If you don’t think you’ll reuse a tag, don’t apply it to a post. And if an eleventh category comes knocking on your door, you should probably consider reorganizing them, perhaps with sub-categories. Several WordPress plugins can help you reorganize your taxonomies, but most of them don’t seem to add redirects after merging or deleting taxonomies – be sure to do that, of course. Read all about taxonomy SEO.

Need some help restructuring your site? Yoast SEO Premium offers you everything you need: a Redirect manager to prevent people from landing on pages that don’t exist anymore and InternaI linking suggestions if you want to make sure all your related content and cornerstones are connected and found by search engines. And, because Yoast SEO Academy is part of Yoast SEO Premium now, you’ll automatically get access to our Site structure training too!

Don’t take this lightly

Although one can write this down in a couple of paragraphs, reorganizing a website can be a lengthy process that shouldn’t be taken lightly. When changing the structure of a large website, it could make sense to change the permalink structure as well, which can have a lot of consequences and isn’t something we’d advise doing if you don’t know the drill. In that case, it might make sense to consult an experienced SEO to help you do it right.

Read more: Site structure: the ultimate guide »

The post Clean up your site structure: how to reorganize your website appeared first on Yoast.

At a certain point, your website can grow to a monstrous collection of pages. You may realize that you have too many items in your menu and that the coherence of your website is nowhere to be found. Time to clean this mess up! But where to start? It’s a tough job, and sometimes it
The post Clean up your site structure: how to reorganize your website appeared first on Yoast.Read MoreContent SEO, Link building, Site Structure

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5 Chatbot Examples That Will Change the Way You Look at Customer Interactions

If you’ve ever interacted with a chatbot, you know it’s not always a smooth experience.

Sometimes they can’t help you with a single question, and other times the information they dump on you is just too much, and there’s often dead ends involved. Creating a chatbot that strikes a perfect balance for potential customers is a subtle science, and not every company gets it right.

A great chatbot not only offers users some form of value, but it also executes it in a way that engages those users as opposed to just serving as another way to capture lead information. If you want to strengthen your customer interactions, start by looking at some of the best chatbot examples in the business for inspiration.

Chatbot Example #1: Seattle Balloon Assistant Cuts Down Staff Workload

chatbot examples seattle ballooning

Source: Seattle Ballooning

What it is: The Seattle Balloon Assistant, built with conversational marketing platform Drift, was designed for Seattle-based hot air balloon company Seattle Ballooning.

Why it’s great: This AI chatbot is a prime example of how to streamline the customer experience and save time for staff who are busy handling more complicated tasks. Users can easily interact with the virtual assistant by choosing from a number of different simple inquiries the chatbot can help solve.

If your inquiry is more specific, you can also type out a question for the chatbot, and its natural language processing (NLP) technology can generally make sense of what you’re asking. This saves both the customer and staff member time.

The takeaway: If your business often hears FAQs from customers, you can save your staff a lot of time by using a chatbot to answer simple questions. Let your staff focus on more complex tasks while your chatbot handles inquiries that are quick and easy to resolve.

Chatbot Example #2: Ask Benji Answers Questions About a Complex Process

Ask Benji SMS bot interaction example

What it is: Ask Benji is a FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) digital assistant that helps post-secondary students navigate securing financial aid. Arizona State University originally created this chatbot for high school students looking to attend their school, but it now serves students at other Arizona-area schools as well.

Why it’s great: Getting financial aid can be a very challenging and stressful process for students. They don’t know what documents they need to send or who to send them to. They forget deadlines for a specific grant they were hoping to get. There’s a ton of room for error.

Ask Benji aims to make the student financial aid process easier. Only available via SMS, this chatbot gives students important information related to FAFSA. It offers a number of resources and links so that students can easily understand what’s required of them and when they have to submit certain documents to apply.

As you can see from the interaction above, Benji is still learning, and he’s honest about it. However, when the Benji team gets a signal that Benji has failed to answer a user’s question, they can step in and make sure the user is getting the answers they need.

The takeaway: Keep your audience engaged by offering real-time information and resources about challenging subject matter. If your bot isn’t perfect and is still training, make sure your users understand that, and make sure to step in with live support when users are frustrated or stuck. 

Chatbot Example #3: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Chatbots Entertain Users

chatbot examples ninja turtles

Source: Massively

What it is: Conversational marketing platform Massively created these chatbots to promote the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows movie. With this technology, the movie’s fans could have light-hearted interactions with characters from the film.

Why it’s great: Massively created these chatbots and deployed them on chatbot channel Kik. Not only do the chatbots talk like the characters from the movie, but they also offer fans exclusive clips and other goodies.

Another unique feature of these chatbots is that they interact with each other. Within a chat with one character, you can be directed to chat with another one, and then the previous character will ask you about that conversation. It’s a great way to engage multiple chatbots instead of just one.

This chatbot resulted in 44 million messages exchanged. The strong response was a clear sign that people are happy to engage with chatbots just for fun.

The takeaway: Your chatbot doesn’t always need to be a beacon of useful information for users, especially if you already have other ways to relay that information to them. At their core, chatbots are meant to be fun technologies on the cutting edge of conversational marketing. A chatbot that entertains users is a great way to engage them with your brand.

Chatbot Example #4: The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas Has Intimate Audience Understanding

chatbot examples rose

What it is: Rose is a hotel chatbot that services The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas, a luxury resort and casino based in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Why it’s great: The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas lovingly refers to Rose as their “resident mischief-maker & digital concierge.” She’s funny, helpful, and packs plenty of attitude. Interacting with Rose is like chatting with a sassy friend that likes to have a good time.

On top of that, Rose is also very helpful and knowledgeable. She’s known as a digital concierge that can help users get event tickets, make dinner reservations, offer suggestions, and complete other hotel tasks with ease. Most things that a real-life hotel concierge can do, Rose can do — but in much less time.

Hotel guests that interact with Rose spend 37% more money than those who don’t. There’s a clear appetite for a chatbot that is not only useful but also relatable.

The takeaway: Craft your chatbot around your audience. The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas is known for hosting big parties and events for a younger demographic. Interactions with Rose reflect that playful Las Vegas spirit in a big way, which is represented in her tone and the way she talks. Understanding your company’s demographics is crucial in dictating how your chatbot should interact with users.

Chatbot Example #5: Sephora Chatbot Finds a New Niche

chatbot examples sephora

What it is: This chatbot was hosted on the Kik chatbot channel for international cosmetics brand Sephora.

Why it’s great: Sephora’s Kik-hosted chatbot is packed with useful makeup and cosmetics tips for all kinds of users. With that in mind, the company did a stellar job of adding images and videos for their customers on the platform to engage with visually. 

Sephora recognized that adding a visual component was critical to engaging their audience on a conversational app. They wanted to see products in practice before purchasing them. As a result, the Sephora on Kik chatbot saw over 600,000 interactions and 1,500 questions submitted

The takeaway: Don’t be afraid to have your chatbot set up for a specific audience. While it’s sometimes good to cast a wide net, catering to a smaller piece of your wider demographic is also useful. Customers are likely to engage with your niche chatbot because it directly addresses their needs.

Make Your Chatbot Stand Out

Every chatbot example listed above stands out in one way or another. If you want your chatbot to shine among industry competitors, consider what you need to do to set it apart.

More information? More specific functionality? More humor? There isn’t one clear path to creating a chatbot, but these types of elements help set it apart from other chatbots in your industry.

As they become standard marketing and sales tools in years to come, chatbots are also becoming easier to build for businesses of all sizes. Get insight into how to build a great chatbot without any coding experience in this resource.

The post 5 Chatbot Examples That Will Change the Way You Look at Customer Interactions appeared first on Alexa Blog.

If you’ve ever interacted with a chatbot, you know it’s not always a smooth experience. Sometimes they can’t help you with a single question, and other times the information they dump on you is just too much, and there’s often dead ends involved. Creating a chatbot that strikes a perfect balance for potential customers is […]
The post 5 Chatbot Examples That Will Change the Way You Look at Customer Interactions appeared first on Alexa Blog.Read MoreConversational MarketingAlexa Blog